Friday, December 31, 2010

Evening, in my words + evenings

avern : evening

The Illunse word for evening is avern. Avern is a last name. Avern is an unusual masculine first name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for evening which is æfen (which I transliterate to aefen) and the Latin word for evening vesper.

avernas : evenings

The Illunse word for evenings (nominative plural) is avernas. Avernas-le-Bauduin is a city in Belgium. D'Avernas is a rare last name.

Evenings in Latin is vesperi. Evenings in Old English is æfenas.

Sorry I was away for so long. Christmastime was busy around here.

Sunday, December 19, 2010

Bible trace, from Luke

Listed below are versions of Luke Chapter 19, Verse 36 from various Bibles over the years. The oldest ones are beyond my understanding. I can read only several words of the verses in Latin and in Old English. For instance, I know the words for road, via and weg.

Latin, Vulgate - 405
eunte autem illo substernebant vestimenta sua in via

Old English, West Saxon - 990
and þa he for. hi strehton under hine hyra reaf on þam wege.

Middle English, Wycliffe - 1395
And whanne he wente, thei strowiden her clothis in the weie.

Renaissance English, Tyndale - 1526
And as he wet they spredde their clothes in ye waye.

Jacobean English, King James - 1611
And as he went, they spread their clothes in the way.

Basic English, Ogden - 1964
And while he went on his way they put their clothing down on the road in front of him.

Friday, December 17, 2010

Morning, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for morning is arin. The word arinya is morning in the adjectival sense and hence means
early, for example arinya árë means morning sun in Quenya.

The Sindarin word for morning is aur (day, sunlight, morning).

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Morning, in my words

meorn : morning

The Illunse word for morning (early in the day) is meorn. Meorn is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word morgen (morn, morning, forenoon; sunrise; morrow) and the Latin word mane (morning, morn; in the morning).

I'll figure out the plural later. The Latin word is undeclined.

Sunday, December 12, 2010

Planet, in my words + planets

astul : planet

The Illunse word for planet (wandering star) is astul. Astul is a unusual masculine first name. Astul is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word tungol (luminary, star, planet, constellation) and the Latin word astrum (star, heavenly body, planet / sun / moon). I decided not to use the lesser used Latin word planeta, even though it's the more accurate word.

astula : planets

The Illunse word for planets (nominative plural) is astula. In Latin astula means splinter/chip; shavings.

The Latin plural of astrum is astri. The Old English plural of tungol in is tungol (same as the singular).

I didn't find a word for planet in either Quenya or Sindarin. But there are stars Tolkien named in Quenya that are tentatively identified as our planets.

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Constellation, in my words + constellations

tindol : constellation

The Illunse word for constellation is tindol. Tindol is an uncommon last name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word tungol (luminary, star, planet, constellation) and the Latin word sidus (star; constellation).

tindolas : constellations

The Illunse word for constellations (nominative plural) is tindolas. In German tindolas means ivy gourds or scarlet gourds.

Constellations in Latin is sideris. The plural of tungol in Old English is tungol (same as the singular).

I didn't find a word for constellation in either Quenya or Sindarin. Although I did find names for several constellations, such as Orion and the Big Dipper, in Quenya.

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Star, in my words (revised) + stars

strela : star

The Illunse word for star is strela. Strela is a rare last name. In Russian (transliterated) strela means arrow. In Serbo-Croatian stréla means arrow. Strela is the name of cities and towns in Italy, Belarus and Russia.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for star which is steorra and the Latin word for star stella (star; planet, heavenly body). Previouly I used the Latin word astrum (star, heavenly body, planet / sun / moon), and my word was stera.

strelan : stars

The Illunse word for stars (nominative plural) is strelan. Strelan is an unusual last name.

Stars in Latin is stellae. Stars in Old English is steorran.

Here's a link to Star, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Sunday, December 05, 2010

City, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for city is osto (a strong or fortified building or place, strong place, fortress; city, town with wall round).

The Sindarin words for city are ost (city, town with wall round; fortress or stronghold; citadel) and caras (city (built above ground)).

Saturday, December 04, 2010

City, in my words + cities

ciste : city

The Illunse word for city is ciste. Ciste is a rare last name. In Scottish Gaelic ciste means chest, box. Ciste Dhubh is a mountain situated in the Scottish Highlands. In Italian ciste can mean cyst.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for city civitas (community / city / town / state; citizens), and the Old English word for city ceaster (a city, fort, castle, town; used as a general term, or applied to foreign towns).

cista : cities

The Illunse word for cities (nominative plural) is cista. Cista is a rare last name. In Latin cista means a trunk, a chest. A cista mystica was a basket or chest used to house sacred snakes in the initiation ceremony of the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). Cista is the name of cities in the Czech Republic, Croatia and Serbia.

Cities in Latin is civitatis. Cities in Old English is ceastra.

By the way, I haven't been stuck. I've been sick.

Sunday, November 28, 2010

What if I get stuck?

This may seem odd, getting stuck when making a constructed language, but occasionally I get confounded with words. I play with Latin and Old English, but I don't know the languages. There are rules to building Illunse words, such as that I'm limited in the letters that I can use. Sometimes I can't seem to mix the Latin and the Old English words in any allowable way that I like. When that happens, I usually try another word, and come back to the skipped word later.

I prefer for my Illunse words to vaguely resemble the modern English word or synonym of it. Of course, that is not always possible. Some Illunse words look somewhat like the Latin words, especially when the Latin word -- or a derived Spanish or French word -- is familiar to me.

Lately I seem to be working with ancient terms, such as walled towns and castles. Someday I'll want to define a word, but won't find it in archaic languages of Old English and Latin. Then I'll be truly stuck. Perhaps, I could try using Middle English for Old English. I actually do have a Middle English dictionary. But for Latin, what do I use, Italian? When I get stuck, I'll figure something out.

Friday, November 26, 2010

Street, in my words (revised) + streets (revised)

stae : street

The Illunse word for street is stae. Stae is an uncommon last name. San Stae is a church in Venice, Italy. Stae is the name of a city in Denmark.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for street which is platea (broad way, street, avenue) and the Old English word for street which is strǽt (a road in a town, a street, a paved road, high road). (Note: the Old English word is from the Latin word strata which means spread, coverlet)

staea : streets

The Illunse word for streets (nominative plural) is staea. Staea is possibly a rare last name.

Streets in Latin is plateae. Streets in Old English is stræta.

My previous Illunse word for street was stape. Streets was previously stapa. I changed this word because I made the word for town be stope, which was too similar.

Thursday, November 25, 2010

Walled town, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for walled town are opelë (walled house or village, town) and tirios (a town with walls and towers).

The Sindarin word for walled town is gobel (walled house or village, town).

These words can apply to a walled village, as well as a walled town. There are other words which seem more for cities.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Walled town, in my words + walled towns

burs : walled town

The Illunse word for walled town is burs. Burs is a last name. Burs were an ancient Germanic tribe of Dacia. Burs is the name of towns in Iran and Sweden.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word urbs (city, walled town), and the Old English word burg (dwelling or dwellings within a fortified enclosure, fort, castle; borough, walled town).

bursa : walled towns

The Illunse word for walled towns (nominative plural) is bursa. Bursa is a last name. In Latin bursa means purse. Bursa is the name of a cities in Turkey and Ethiopia.

Walled towns in Latin is urbis. Walled towns in Old English is byrg.

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Town, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for town is irin, which is apparently not a valid later Quenya word.

I couldn't find a generic Sindarin word for town. There are words for a walled town, though. I'll mention those words after my Illunse word for walled town.

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Town, in my words + towns

stope : town

The Illunse word for town is stope. Stope is a last name. In English a mining term for a horizontal excavation which in series looks like steps. Stope is the name of a city in Slovenia.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for town oppidum (a town, city, collection of dwellings), and the Old English word for town castel (a town, village). This word is also inspired by the Old English word stów which means a place, spot, locality, site.

stopan : towns

The Illunse word for towns (nominative plural) is stopan (in part because I didn't care for making the plural stopi or stopu). Stopan is a rare last name. Stopan is the name of a city in Boznia & Herzegovina.

Towns in Latin is oppidi. Towns in Old English is castlu.

Yes, I know that this word is very similar to my existing word for street, which is stape. I've decided that town trumps street. My word for street will later be changed.

Friday, November 12, 2010

Village, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for village is masto.

I couldn't find a generic Sindarin word for village. Although there is a word for a walled house or village, town. I'll mention that word later.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Village, in my words + villages

vicun : village

The Illunse word for village is vicun. Vicun is a rare last name. Similarly named vicuña is a South American animal which is related to the llama.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for village which is vicus (village; hamlet; street, row of houses), and the Old English word for village which is tún (enclosure, yard; manor, homestead; group of houses, village; a town of Roman Britain) or wíc (dwelling-place, mansion; village, town) or ceasterwíc (village).

vicuni : villages

The Illunse word for villages (nominative plural) is vicuni.

Villages in Latin is vici. Villages in Old English is túnas or wíca.

Monday, November 08, 2010

Bridge, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for bridge are yanwë (bridge, joining, isthmus) and yanta (bridge, yoke).

The Sindarin word for bridge is iant.

Sunday, November 07, 2010

Bridge, in my words + bridges

brycon : bridge

The Illunse word for bridge is brycon. Brycon is an unusual last name. Brycon is a genus of fish that can be found in the Paraguay river basin.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for bridge which is pons and the Old English word for bridge which is brycg.

brycona : bridges

The Illunse word for bridges (nominative plural) is brycona.

Bridges in Latin is pontes. Bridges in Old English is brycga.

Friday, November 05, 2010

Wall, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for wall is ramba.

The Sindarin word for wall is ram. The word rammas means great wall.

Thursday, November 04, 2010

Wall, in my words + walls

wrul : wall

The Illunse word for wall is wrul. WRUL is a FM country radio station in Illinois. WRUL (World Radio University Listeners) was historically a shortwave broadcast station.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for wall which is murus (wall, city wall) and the Old English word for wall which is weall (wall, dike, earthwork, rampart, dam).

wrulas : walls

The Illunse word for walls (nominative plural) is wrulas. Wrulas is somewhat similar to walrus.

Walls in Latin is muri. Walls in Old English is weallas.

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

Gates, in my words

perata : gates

The Illunse word for gates (nominative plural) is perata. Perata is a last name. In Finnish perata means to gut (a fish). In Indonesian perata means grading, leveller.

Gates in Latin is portae. Gates in Old English is gatu.

Gate (singular) in Illunse is perat, which is a mix of the Latin word (porta) and Old English word (geat).

Here's a link to Gate, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words, which includes words for gates.

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Bible trace, from Mark

How about another Bible trace? This Bible verse, in Latin and various versions of English, is Mark Chapter 8, Verse 23.

I'm getting better at reading Middle English.

Latin, Vulgate - 405
et adprehendens manum caeci eduxit eum extra vicum et expuens in oculos eius inpositis manibus suis interrogavit eum si aliquid videret

Old English, West Saxon - 990
& þa æt-ran he þas blinden hand endlædde hine buton þa wic. & spætte on hiseagen. & his hand on asette & hine axode.hwæder he aht ge-seage.

Middle English, Wycliffe - 1395
And whanne he hadde take the blynde mannus hoond, he ledde hym out of the street, and spete in to hise iyen, and sette hise hoondis on hym; and he axide hym, if he saye ony thing.

Renaissance English, Tyndale - 1526
And he caught the blynde by the honde and leade him out of the toune and spat in his eyes and put his hondes apon him and axed him whether he saw ought.

Jacobean English, King James - 1611
And he took the blind man by the hand, and led him out of the town; and when he had spit on his eyes, and put his hands upon him, he asked him if he saw ought.

Basic English, Ogden - 1964
And he took the blind man by the hand, and went with him out of the town; and when he had put water from his mouth on his eyes, and put his hands on him, he said, Do you see anything?

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Tavern, in my words + taverns

tiwern : tavern

The Illunse word for tavern is tiwern.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tavern which is taberna (tavern, inn; shed; stall/booth; small shop), and the Old English word for tavern which is wínærn (tavern, cellar; drinking hall, wine hall).

tiwerna : taverns

The Illunse word for taverns (nominative plural) is tiwerna.

Taverns in Latin is tabernae. Taverns in Old English is wínærn.

Sorry for the less frequent blog postings. I've been rather busy lately.

Friday, October 22, 2010

Street, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + streets

The Quenya word for street is mallë (street, road), and the plural streets is maller.

The Sindarin words for street are othrad, which may be obsolete, and rath (course, riverbed; street). The words for the plural streets seem to be ethraid and raist.

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Street, in my words + streets

stape : street

The Illunse word for street is stape. Stape is a last name. Stape is a hamlet and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for street which is platea (broad way, street, avenue) and the Old English word for street which is strǽt (a road in a town, a street, a paved road, high road). (Note: the Old English word is from the Latin word strata which means spread, coverlet)

stapa : streets

The Illunse word for streets (nominative plural) is stapa. Stapa is a rare last name. In Lojban stapa means step. Stapa (aka Stapar) is the name of a place in Iceland.

Streets in Latin is plateae. Streets in Old English is stræta.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for street is now stae. Streets is now staea.

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Roads, in my words

weas : roads

The Illunse word for roads (nominative plural) is weas. Weas is a last name. In Old English wéas means by chance, accidentally. The Weas were a native tribe originally located in western Indiana.

Roads in Latin is viae. Roads in Old English is wegas.

Road (singular) in Illunse is wea, which is a mix of the Latin word (via) and Old English word (weg).

I think that's enough with plurals for existing words. I'll have to construct some new words. Hopefuly I'll also find some Quenya and Sindarin words.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for roads is now weaga.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Temples, in my words

tealga : temples

The Illunse word for temples (nominative plural) is tealga.

Temples in Latin is templi. Temples in Old English is hearga.

Temple (singular) in Illunse is tealg, which is a mix of the Latin word (templum) and Old English word (hearg).

If you were watching closely, you might have noticed that I posted a revised word for temple. Decent enough word, but it didn't look quite right for Illunse. I trashed that and went back to my earlier word.

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Churches, in my words

clecian : churches

The Illunse word for churches (nominative plural) is clecian. In Welsh clecian means to snap, to crack, to click, to clack. Clecian is a rare last name.

Churches in Latin is ecclesiae. Churches in Old English is cirican.

Church (singular) in Illunse is clecia, which is a mix of the Latin word (ecclesia) and Old English word (cirice). In most towns there are mutliple churches.

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Houses, in my words

hudas : houses

The Illunse word for houses (nominative plural) is hudas. Hudas is an uncommon last name. In Tagalog hudas (from Judas) means to double-cross. Hudas is the name of a city in India.

Houses (and house) in Latin is domus. Houses (and house) in Old English is hús.

House (singular) in Illunse is hud, which is a mix of Latin and Old English words. In a town there are houses (plural).

Saturday, October 09, 2010

Next word building project - things in a town

My next Illunse word building project is going to be things in a town. As I'm using Old English and Latin words to construct my words, these will be words describing things found in a very backward, historical town. Basic terms. Don't expect to see words for shopping mall, traffic light, movie theater or car dealership.

I already have several words that fit this category. My word for house is hud. My word for church is clecia.

Following this project, I’ll likely take on interrogatives, question words, which I think will be complicated due to grammar.

Friday, October 08, 2010

Ankle, in my words + ankles

tacle : ankle

The Illunse word for ankle is tacle. Tacle is an uncommon last name. In French means tacle means tackle, tackling.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for ankle which is talus, and the Old English word for ankle which is ancléow.

tacli : ankles

The Illunse word for ankles (nominative plural) is tacli. Tacli is a rare last name.

Ankles in Latin is tali. Ankles in Old English is ancléow (same as ankle).

I couldn't find Quenya or Sindarin words for ankle.

I think this is enough body part words for now. I'm ready for something new.

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Tongue, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for tongue is lamba (physical tongue). Similar word lambë means language.

The Sindarin word for tongue is lam (physical tongue and language).

Monday, October 04, 2010

Tongue, in my words + tongues

tingu : tongue

The Illunse word for tongue is tingu. Tingu Rangadu (1982) is an Indian (Telugu) movie. Tingu is a masculine Indian first name. Tingu is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tongue which is lingua, and the Old English word for tongue which is tunge.

Both the Latin and the Old English words also have secondary meanings as speech, language.

tingua : tongues

The Illunse word for tongues (nominative plural) is tingua.

Tongues in Latin is linguae. Tongues in Old English is tungan.

Saturday, October 02, 2010

Bible trace from Genesis

This Bible verse, in Latin and various versions of English, is Genesis Chapter 21, Verse 14. I found this on Webster's Online Dictionary under the English word shoulder.

I find the Latin and Old English versions interesting, but I can't read much of either of them.

Latin, Vulgate - 405
surrexit itaque Abraham mane et tollens panem et utrem aquae inposuit scapulae eius tradiditque puerum et dimisit eam quae cum abisset errabat in solitudine Bersabee

Old English, West Saxon - 990
Abraham ða aras on ærne mergen sona ond lædde aweg ða wylne Agar ond Ismahel samod ond sealde him formete, hlaf, ond wæter, ond gewende him ham. Þa ða hi comon to þam westene Bersabee ða wurdon hi on gedwolan.

Middle English, Wycliffe - 1395
And so Abraham aroos erly, and takynge breed, and a botel of water, leide to the shuldur of hym, and bitoke the childe, and lefte hir; the which, whanne he `was gon awey, erride in the wildirnes of Bersabee.

Renaissance English, Tyndale - 1526
And Abraham rose vp early in the mornyng and toke brede and a bottell with water and gaue it vnto Hagar puttynge it on hir shulders wyth the lad also and sent her awaye. And she departed and wadred vpp and doune in the wyldernes of Berseba.

Jacobean English, King James - 1611
And Abraham rose up early in the morning, and took bread, and a bottle of water, and gave it unto Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, and the child, and sent her away: and she departed, and wandered in the wilderness of Beersheba.

Victorian English, Webster - 1833
And Abraham rose early in the morning, and took bread, and a bottle of water, and gave it to Hagar (putting it on her shoulder) and the child, and sent her away; and she departed, and wandered in the wilderness of Beer-sheba.

Basic English, Ogden - 1964
And early in the morning Abraham got up, and gave Hagar some bread and a water-skin, and put the boy on her back, and sent her away: and she went, wandering in the waste land of Beer-sheba

Friday, October 01, 2010

Shoulder, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for shoulder may be róma, but that meaning is likely obsolete. The dictionaries also define róma as horn (instrument) and loud sound, trumpet sound.

There doesn't appear to be a Sindarin word for shoulder.

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Shoulder, in my words + shoulders

huxel : shoulder

The Illunse word for shoulder is huxel. Huxel is an uncommon last name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for shoulder (and upper arm) which is humerus, and the Old English word for shoulder which is eaxel.

There's an X in this word! Not CS for X. Both Latin and Old English use the letter X, so I guess I will too.

huxela : shoulders

The Illunse word for shoulders (nominative plural) is huxela.

Shoulders in Latin is humeri. Shoulders in Old English is eaxela.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Knee, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for knee is occa.

I didn't find a Sindarin word for knee.

Monday, September 27, 2010

Knee, in my words + knees

cneg : knee

The Illunse word for knee is cneg. CNeg is a legal document abbreviation for Contributory Negligence.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for knee which is genu, and the Old English word for knee which is cnéow.

cnegu : knees

The Illunse word for knees (nominative plural) is cnegu. CNEGU is an acronym for Le Comité Nord-Est des Groupes Ufologiques (The Committee Northeast UFO Groups).

Knees in Latin is genus. Knees in Old English is cnéow (same as knee).

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Ears, in my words (revised)

euran : ears

The Illunse word for ears (nominative plural) is euran. Euran Pallo (abbreviated EuPa) is a football club from Finland. Euran is a rare masculine first name. Euran is a rare last name.

Ears in Latin is auris. Ears in Old English is éaran.

My previous word for ears was eura. I decided to change this word to resemble the Old English nominative case plural.

Saturday, September 25, 2010

two additional vowel combinations

I may decide to use AI and OU as additional vowel combinations in Illunse. Neither combination appears in Latin or Old English words.

In Illunse, pronounce ai as in aisle. In Latin this diphthong is spelled ae, but I'm already pronouncing ae as æ in Old English.

In Illunse, pronounce ou as oo in pool, or u in rule. This is like the Latin ū (u macron) and the Old English ú (long u). In Middle English ou was often used to represent this sound.

Friday, September 24, 2010

Heart, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for heart is hón (physical heart).

The Sindarin word for heart is hûn (physical heart).

There are other words for heart in the moral and spiritual sense, and heart in inner thought and resolve. In Quenya these words are órë (heart, inner mind, spirit) and indo (heart, mood, resolve, will). In Sindarin they are gûr (heart in the moral sense) and ind (inner thought, meaning, heart).

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Heart, in my words + hearts

corthe : heart

The Illunse word for heart is corthe. Corthe is an unusual last name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for heart which is cor, and the Old English word for heart which is heorte.

In both Latin and Old English heart also means (as well as a part of the body) soul, spirit; mind, intellect; affections.

corthan : hearts

The Illunse word for hearts (nominative plural) is corthan. Corthan is an uncommon last name. Corthan is an unusual masculine first name.

Hearts in Latin is cordis. Hearts in Old English is heortan.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Head, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + heads

The Quenya word for head is cár and the plural heads is cari.

The Sindarin word for head is dôl and the plural heads is dýl.

Monday, September 20, 2010

Head, in my words + heads

cahed : head

The Illunse word for head is cahed. Cahed is a misspelling of cached and cashed.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for head which is caput, and the Old English word for head which is héafod.

cahedu : heads

The Illunse word for heads (nominative plural) is cahedu. Cahedu seems to mean something, but I can't translate it, in Romanized Arabic.

Heads in Latin is capitis. Heads in Old English is héafdu.

Sunday, September 19, 2010

Tin, in my words (revised)

stin : tin

The Illunse word for tin (metal) is stin. Stin is a last name. In Norwegian Stin is a rare feminine first name. Stin is the name of a city in Afghanistan.

This word is a mixture of the Late Latin word for tin which is stannum (in Old Latin tin is plumbum candidum literally "white lead"), and the Old English word for tin which is tin (same as Modern English).

My previous Illunse word for tin was snin. I'm stealing stin for tin from my other contructed language, Fennas. Even though snin was interesting since the atomic symbol for tin is Sn, I like stin better and it's a better mix.

Saturday, September 18, 2010

Pronouncing oe, eu and eo

In Illunse, pronounce oe as oi in oil. This pronunciation follows Latin.

In Illunse, pronounce eu as in feud. This is approximately the same as the Latin pronunciation of eu.

In Illunse, pronounce eo as in...Beowulf, that's as in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem. Pronounce it like ay + oh (short o). That's like éo in Old English which is a diphthong. This is not a Modern English vowel.

I may later alter some existing words for pronunciation.

Friday, September 17, 2010

Mouth, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for mouth are anto and náva. Plurals weren't mentioned.

I didn't find a Sindarin word for mouth, the body part. There was a word for mouth of a river or estuary, but that's something different.

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Mouth, in my words + mouths

mot : mouth

The Illunse word for mouth is mot. Mot is a last name. In English mot means witticism. In French means word. In Albanian mot means weather. In Dutch mot means moth. In Old English mot means mote. In Old English similar word mót means moot, meeting, assembly. In Norwegian and Swedish mot means against, towards. Mot is a Semitic god. Mot is the name of a Bolian character in Star Trek. Mot (or De Mot) is the name of a city in Belgium.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for mouth which is os (mouth, speech), and the Old English word for mouth which is múþ (mouth, opening).

motas : mouths

The Illunse word for mouths (nominative plural) is motas. Motas is an uncommon last name. Motas is the name of a city in Albania.

Mouths in Latin is oris. Mouths in Old English is múþas.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Nose, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + noses

The Quenya words for nose are nengwë with the plural noses nengwi, and mundo (snout, nose, cape (of land)).

The Sindarin words for nose are nem with the plural noses nim, and bund (snout, nose, cape (of land)) with the plural noses bynd.

Monday, September 13, 2010

Nose, in my words + noses

nasu : nose

The Illunse word for nose is nasu. Nasu is an unusual last name. In Corsican, Sardinian and Sicilian nasu means nose. In Japanase (transliterated) nasu means eggplant.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for nose which is nasus, and the Old English word for nose which is nosu.

nasa : noses

The Illunse word for noses (nominative plural) is nasa. Nasa is an uncommon last name. In Aymara nasa means nose. In Basque nasa means dock. NASA is an acronym for National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Nasa is the name of cities in South Korea, Tanzania, China, Ghana, Japan and Afghanistan.

Noses in Latin is nasi. Noses in Old English is nosa.

Saturday, September 11, 2010

Bible trace, another from Luke

The Bible Trace I'm featuring today is Luke Chapter 17, Verse 24. This is information that I found on the Internet. I don't have all these versions of the Bible.

I do a little better than usual on reading this verse in Old English, I recognize some words. I don't do much better with Latin. The Middle English spelling is rather difficult to decyrpt.

Latin, Vulgate - 405
nam sicut fulgur coruscans de sub caelo in ea quae sub caelo sunt fulget ita erit Filius hominis in die sua

Old English, West Saxon - 990
Witodlice swa se ligræsc lyhtende scinð under heofone on þa ðing þe under heofone synt: swa bið mannes sunu on his dæge;

Middle English, Wycliffe - 1395
for as leyt schynynge from vndur heuene schyneth in to tho thingis that ben vndur heuene, so schal mannus sone be in his dai.

Renaissance English, Tyndale - 1526
for as the lyghtenynge that apereth out of the one parte of the heven and shyneth vnto the other parte of heven: Soo shall the sonne of man be in his dayes.

Jacobean English, King James - 1611
For as the lightning, that lighteneth out of the one part under heaven, shineth unto the other part under heaven; so shall also the Son of man be in his day.

Victorian English, Webster - 1833
For as the lightning that lighteneth from the one part under heaven, shineth to the other part under heaven; so shall also the Son of man be in his day.

Basic English, Ogden - 1964
For as in a thunderstorm the bright light is seen from one end of the sky to the other, so will the Son of man be when his time comes.

Friday, September 10, 2010

Tooth, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + teeth

The Quenya word for tooth is nelet (also nelcë) and the plural teeth is nelci. The Quenya word carca is fang, tooth.

The Sindarin words for tooth are nêl (plural nelig) and nagol (plural naglath). The Sindarin word carch is fang, tooth.

Thursday, September 09, 2010

Tooth, in my words + teeth

tode : tooth

The Illunse word for tooth is tode. Tode is a last name. Tode means deaths in German. Brother Tode is a Marvel comic books character of the fictional Deviants race.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tooth which is dens (tooth; tusk), and the Old English word for tooth which is tóð (tooth; tusk) (the the final leter, which resembles a d with a line through the top, is eth...not d).

todi : teeth

The Illunse word for teeth (nominative plural) is todi. Todi is an uncommon last name. Todi is the name of a city in Central Italy. Todi is also the name of cities in Nigeria and Burma. Todi Nagla is the name of a city in the state of Uttar Pradesh in India.

Teeth in Latin is dentis (similar to dentist). Teeth in Old English is téð.

Tuesday, September 07, 2010

Leg, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + legs

The Quenya word for leg (or stem) is telco and the plural is telqui.

I couldn't find a Sindarin word for leg.

Monday, September 06, 2010

Leg, in my words + legs

scura : leg

The Illunse word for leg is scura. Scura is an uncommon last name. In Italian scura means dark, sombre.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for leg which is crus (leg; shank; shin), and the Old English word for leg which is scanca (a shank, shin, leg from the knee to the foot).

scuran : legs

The Illunse word for legs (nominative plural) is scuran. Scuran is a rare last name.

Legs in Latin is crurus. Legs in Old English is scancan.

Saturday, September 04, 2010

Pronouncing i, ie and ea

In Illunse, pronounce i as in police and machine. Make the sound short, similar to y in very or like how i is pronounced in Spanish. This is how short i, or i without an accent is pronounced in Old English.

In Illunse, pronounce ie as i in pit or his. This is as short i is pronounced in Latin. In Old English ie and íe are instead diphthongs.

In Illunse, pronounce ea as in bead and eat. Make the sound long. This is as í, long i, accented i, is pronounced in Old English. This is how ī (i macron) or long i is pronounced in Latin. In Old English ea and éa are instead diphthongs.

I may need to modify some existing words for pronunciation.

Friday, September 03, 2010

Copper, in my words (revised)

copur : copper

The Illunse word for copper (metal) is copur. Copur is an unusual last name. In Turkish similar word çopur means pit, pock marked. Copur is the name of a city in Turkey.

This word is a mixture of the Late Latin word for copper which is cuprum (the chemical symbol for copper is Cu), and the Old English word for copper which is copor.

Previously I used ár, which better translates as ore, as the Old English word for copper. My old word for copper was cuar.

Thursday, September 02, 2010

Arm, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + arms

The Quenya word for arm is ranco and the plural is ranqui.

The Sindarin word for arm is ranc and the plural is renc. These words are possibly archaic.

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

Arm, in my words + arms

bram : arm

The Illunse word for arm (body part) is bram. Bram is a masculine first name, which can be short for Abraham. Bram Stoker author of the novel Dracula. Bram is a last name. Bram is the name of cities in Albania and France.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for arm which is bracchium (arm, forearm), and the Old English word for arm which is earm.

bramas : arms

The Illunse word for arms (nominative plural) is bramas. Bramas is a rare last name. Bramas is conjugations of the French and the Spanish verbs meaning to bellow.

Arms in Latin is bracchi. Arms in Old English is earmas.

Sunday, August 29, 2010

Ear, in my words (revised) + ears (revised)

eure : ear

The Illunse word for ear is eure. Eure is a last name. Eure is a river and department in the north of France. Eure is the name of a town in North Carolina.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for ear which is auris, and the Old English word for ear which is éare.

eura : ears

The Illunse word for ears (nominative plural) is eura. Eura is an unusual last name. Eura is a unusual feminine first name. Eura is the name of a city in southwest Finland.

Ears in Latin is auris. Ears in Old English is éaran.

I decided to change this word. Never mind that I just created this word. I thought that I'd rather have a word starting in E. I've been starting too many words for body parts like the Latin words.

Note that I've changed the word for ears from eura to euran.

Saturday, August 28, 2010

Pronouncing e and ei

In Illunse, pronounce e as in met or pet. This is as the Latin e (unaccented e), and as (or similar to) the Old English e (short or unaccented e).

In Illunse, pronounce ei as a in way or plate, or as ey in hey. This is as ē (e macron) or ei in Reconstructed Ancient Latin Pronunciation, and as the Old English é (long or accented e).

Friday, August 27, 2010

Ear, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + ears

The Quenya word for ear is likely lár, and the dual plural (pair of ears) is likely laru. Apparently Tolkien's wording was not clear.

The Sindarin word for ear is lhewig and the plural (one person's pair of ears) is lhaw.

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Ear, in my words +ears

aure : ear

The Illunse word for ear is aure. Aure is a last name. In Interlingua aure means ear. In Quenya aure means daylight. In Norwegian aure means trout. Aure is the name of a cities in India, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea and Norway. Aure is the name of a town in Minnesota. Vielle-Aure is the name of a town in the Midi-Pyrenees region of France.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for ear which is auris, and the Old English word for ear which is éare.

auran : ears

The Illunse word for ears (nominative plural) is auran. Auran is a last name. Auran is the name of a city in Norway.

Ears in Latin is auris. Ears in Old English is éaran.

That aure is ear in Interlingua, which is an international auxiliary language, might indicate that I picked a good, reasonable word for ear.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for ear is now eure, the word for ears is eura.

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Foot, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + feet

The Quenya word for foot is tál and the plural feet is tálin. In an early form of Qenya (pre-Quenya) foot is tala with the dual plural (pair of feet) talwi.

The Sindarin word for foot is tâl and the plural feet is tail.

Monday, August 23, 2010

Foot, in my words + feet

pef : foot

The Illunse word for foot is pef. Pef is a rare last name. Ba-Pef was a minor underworld god in Egyptian mythology.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for foot which is pes, and the Old English word for foot which is fót.

pefi : feet

The Illunse word for feet (nominative plural) is pefi. Pefi is a unusual feminine first name.

Feet in Latin is pedis. Feet in Old English is fét. Both the plurals seem to be irregular. Where did that d come from in Latin? The vowel changes in Old English, like in Modern English (foot -> feet).

Saturday, August 21, 2010

Bible Trace, from Luke

The Bible Trace I'm featuring today is Luke Chapter 7, Verse 50. I found this information when surfing the web.

You might think that I can read the Old English version, as I play with Old English words on this blog, but unfortunately I can't. That verse is almost totally unreadable to me. I do much better with the Latin. Probably because I know some Spanish.

It seems there are minor differences in the Middle English, King James, and Modern English translations.

Despite the interesting Middle English spelling, that verse is understandable if you talk it out.

Latin, Vulgate - 405
dixit autem ad mulierem fides tua te salvam fecit vade in pace

Old English, West Saxon - 990
þa cwæþ he to þam wife: þin geleafa þe dyde hale ga nu on sybbe;

Middle English, Wycliffe - 1395
But he seide to the womman, Thi feith hath maad thee saaf; go thou in pees.

Jacobean English, King James - 1611
And he said to the woman, Thy faith hath saved thee; go in peace.

Basic English, Ogden - 1964
And he said to the woman, By your faith you have salvation; go in peace.

Friday, August 20, 2010

Hand, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words +hands

The Quenya word for hand is . The dual plural meaning "a pair of hands" is mát. Also, camba means "the whole hand, but as flexed, with fingers more or less closed, cupped, in the attitude of receiving or holding."

The Sindarin word for hand is cam. Also, mâb means "a hand-full, complete hand."

In addition, Tolkien has completely different words for the left hand and the right hand. I don't think I'll go there.

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Hand, in my words + hands

mand : hand

The Illunse word for hand is mand. Mand is a last name. In Danish mand means man (adult male human). In Dutch mand means basket. Mand is the name of cities in Pakistan, India, China and Hungary (also called Mánd). Mand is a style of folk music singing in Rajasthan, India. Mand is a term in psychology for a verbal operant.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for hand which is manus, and the Old English word for hand which is hand (same as Modern English).

manda : hands

The Illunse word for hands (nominative plural) is manda. Manda is a last name. Manda is a variant of the name Amanda. In Spanish and Portuguese manda means send or sends. Manda is the name of many cities including large cities in Bangladesh, India, Japan, Indonesia and Turkey.

Hands in Latin is manus (same as singular). Eyes in Old English is handa.

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Eye, in my words (revised) + eyes

ocge : eye

The Illunse word for eye is ocge. Ocge is a rare last name. OCGE is an acronym for Ortho Cresyl Glycidyl Ether.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for eye which is oculus, and the Old English word for eye which is éage.

In Old English cg is a valid consonant combination. Although I'm not sure if I'll pronounce it the same.

My previous Illunse word for eye was eocl.

Here's a link to Eye, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

ocgi : eyes

The Illunse word for eyes (nominative plural) is ocgi.

Eyes in Latin is oculi. Eyes in Old English is éagan. Eyes in Quenya is hendi.

Saturday, August 14, 2010

Gloria Patri, in Latin and Quenya

Glory Be to the Father, also known as Gloria Patri, is a doxology, a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian liturgies. Below is the Gloria Patri in three languages; English, Latin and Quenya.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning,
is now,
and ever shall be,
world without end.
Amen.

LATIN
Gloria Patri,
et Filio,
et Spiritui Sancto.
Sicut erat in principio,
et nunc,
et semper,
et in Sæcula sæculorum.
Amen.

QUENYA
alkar i ataren,
ar i yondon,
ar i airefesean.
tambe enge i et yestasse,
ar ná sí,
ar oio nai,
ar ter haranye i haranyion.
násie.

Friday, August 13, 2010

Finger, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + fingers

The Quenya words for finger are leper (later sources), and lepsë (earlier sources). Fingers, the plural of leper, is leperi.

The Sindarin words for finger are lebed and leber. The words for fingers are lebid and lebir.

There are additional words, Elvish play-names, for the various fingers.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Finger, in my words + fingers

fidig : finger

The Illunse word for finger is fidig. Fidig mac Feicca was chieftain of Connacht in the Ulster Cycle of early Irish literature.

This word is a mixture the Old English word for finger which is finger (same as Modern English), and the Latin word digitus (finger; toe).

fidigas : fingers

The Illunse word for fingers (nominative plural) is fidigas.

Fingers in Latin is digiti. Fingers in Old English is fingras.

Monday, August 09, 2010

Grove, in my words (revised) + groves

nelm : grove

The Illunse word for grove (wood, small forest) is nelm. Nelm is an uncommon last name. NELM is an acronym for The National English Literary Museum in Grahamstown, South Africa.

This word is a mixture the Latin word nemus (tract of woodland, grove, glade), and the Old English word holt (wood, forest, grove, thicket).

My previous Illunse word for grove was helt. I considered making this word nolm, which is a better mix, but that word seemed too similar to my word for hill, which is holl.

nelmas : groves

The Illunse word for groves (nominative plural) is nelmas.

Groves in Latin is nemoris. Groves in Old English is holtas.

Here's a link to Grove, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Saturday, August 07, 2010

Oh to pronounce O

In Illunse, pronounce o as in go or note or pole. This is as the Latin ō (o macron) and the Old English ó (long or accented o). But make the sound somewhat shorter, similar to how o is pronounced in Spanish.

By the way, the short or unaccented o in both Latin and Old English is pronounced similar to not or pond.

Friday, August 06, 2010

Flowers, in my words

flostan : flowers

The Illunse word for flowers is flostan.

Flowers in Latin is floris. Flowers in Old English is blóstman.

In Old English, the word for flower, blóstma, is what is called a weak masculine noun. That's getting into grammar. Weak nouns form nominative plurals with -an endings. I'm going to include this type of plural ending in Illunse.

By the way, I couldn't find Quenya or Sindarin words for milk.

Thursday, August 05, 2010

Milk, in my words

lema : milk

The Illunse word for milk is lema. Lema is a last name. Lema means motto in Spanish, Portuguese, and Catalan. Lema is the name of cities in China, Haiti, Nigeria, Burma, Spain and Mozambique.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for milk which is lac or lacte, and the Old English word for milk which is meolc.

I made the word for milk, not realizing that my previous word was silk. Rhyming words!

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for milk is now leoc.

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Silk, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words +silken

The Quenya word for silk is samin. The adjective silken is saminda.

I couldn't find a Sindarin word for silk.

Monday, August 02, 2010

Silk, in my words

seor : silk

The Illunse word for silk is seor. Seor is a rare last name. Seor is the name of a city in Pakistan. In Hebrew (transliterated) seor is leaven, that which is used to produce fermentation in dough, such as yeast.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for silk which is seolc or seoloc, and the Latin word for silk which is sericum.

There's another Old English word for silk - síde. I'm not sure which word is more common, but seolc looks more like the Modern English word silk.

Saturday, July 31, 2010

Pronouncing U and Y

In Illunse, pronounce u as in pull or bull. This is as the short u or u without an accent in both Latin and Old English.

In Illunse, pronounce y as in French tu or German für. This is as in Old English. The letter y should always be a vowel, never a consonant. Some words such as year, which is derived from Old English, started with g (géar) in Old English.

Friday, July 30, 2010

Bone, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words +bones

The Quenya word for bone is axo (plural axor in Markirya).

I couldn't find a Sindarin word for bone.

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Bone, in my words

onsa : bone

The Illunse word for bone is onsa. Onsa is a unusual last name. The Henshin Onsa is an item like a tuning fork used for transformation in Japanese tokusatsu television series Kamen Rider Hibiki. Onsa is the name of cities in Nigeria and Sudan.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for bone which is os, and the Old English word for bone which is bán.

For this word I mixed the letters thoroughly.

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Steel, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for steel are erë or eren (iron or steel) and yaisa.

I couldn't find any Sindarin word for steel.

Monday, July 26, 2010

Steel, in my words

chale : steel

The Illunse word for steel is chale. Chale is a last name. In Mexican-American slang chale means "Hell No!" and it's not an offensive word. Chale is the name of cities in the Malawi, Georgia (the country, not in the USA), Mozambique, United Kingdom, Tanzania, Peru, Somalia, and Zambia.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for steel which is chalybs, and the Old English word for steel which is stíele.

This is a new word, not a revision.

Saturday, July 24, 2010

How to pronounce AU, and where AE is at

In Illunse, pronounce au as in how or owl. This is as in Latin. Old English doesn't use au as a diphthong.

In Illunse, pronounce ae as in cat. This is like æ in Old English, the grapheme formed from the letters a and e which is a letter called æsc ("ash tree") in the Old English alphabet. It's unlike Latin in which æ is a ligature representing the Latin diphthong pronounced like ai in aisle.

I decided on these pronunciations for Illunse quite a while ago. These are certain, they won't change.

Friday, July 23, 2010

Iron, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for iron (metal) is anga. The word angaina is an adjective meaning of iron.

The Sindarin word for iron (metal) is ang. The word angren is an adjective meaning of iron.

In Illunse the word ang (the Sindarin word for iron) means ring.

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Iron, in my words (revised)

ifer : iron

The Illunse word for iron (metal) is ifer. Ifer is an uncommon last name. Ifer is the name of a city in Morocco. IFER is an acronym for International Foundation for Ethical Research.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for iron which is isern, and the Latin word for iron which is ferrum.

My previous Illunse word for iron was iserr. The double RR in the word was OK but somewhat questionable.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Lead, in my words (revised)

plud : lead

The Illunse word for lead (metal) is plud. Plud is a rare last name. PLUD is an acronym for People Like Us, Dear (British middle-class slang).

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for lead which is plumbum, and the Old English word for lead which is lead (same as Modern English).

My previous word for lead was ledum. That word seemed too Latin-ish.

Lead is a soft, malleable, heavy metal. Its atomic symbol is Pb, from the Latin plumbum. Lead is one of the seven metals known from antiquity.

Here's a link to Lead, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Gold, in my words (revised)

ald : gold

The Illunse word for gold is ald. Ald is a last name. In Old English ald is an alternate form (Anglian) of the more common West Saxon word eald which means old.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for gold which is aurum and the Old English word for gold which is gold (same as Modern English).

My previous Illunse word for gold was aurl. After looking at my Illunse words for metals, I thought I'd redo this word. My new word is simplier.

Here's a link to Gold, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Monday, July 19, 2010

Tree, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + trees

The Quenya words for tree are alda (a pair of trees aldu; plural aldar) and ornë.

The Sindarin words for tree are galadh (plural gelaidh) and orn (plural yrn).

These are basic words for tree, there are other words for specific types of trees.

As I'm mentioning Illunse plurals, I thought that I'd add Quenya and Sindarin plurals. To construct most Quenya plurals a suffix of -r or -i is added. Most Sindarin nouns are made plural by changing the vowels in the word, similar to the English words man and men.

Sunday, July 18, 2010

Tree, in my words (revised) + trees (revised)

tebor : tree

The Illunse word for tree is tebor. Tebor is a last name. Tebor is a rare masculine first name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tree which is arbor, and the Old English word for tree which is tréow.

My previous Illunse word for tree was arbeo.

teboru : trees

The Illunse word for trees (nominative plural) is teboru.

Trees in Latin is arboris. Trees in Old English is tréowu.

My previous Illunse word for trees arbeon.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for trees is now teboran.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Bible Trace, from Matthew

The Bible Trace I'm featuring today is Matthew Chapter 22, Verse 32. The Latin version is almost readable for me. The Old English version doesn't seem to say the same thing as the other translations.

Looking at the Old English verse, the word folc can be translated as the people and hyrde as pastor. The hys is a spelling variation of the pronoun his. The word lare, see my word for lake, is related to teaching or learning.

I didn't show a modern translation because it's virtually the same as the King James version.

Latin 405 Vulgate
ego sum Deus Abraham et Deus Isaac et Deus Iacob non est Deus mortuorum sed viventium

Old English 990 West Saxon
a þt folc þt ge-hyrde þa wundredonhyo hys lare.

Middle English 1395 Wyclif
Y am God of Abraham, and God of Ysaac, and God of Jacob? he is not God of deede men, but of lyuynge men.

Jacobean English 1611 King James
I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob? God is not the God of the dead, but of the living.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Forests and rivers, in my words

swalda : forests

The Illunse word for forests (plural) is swalda. The word for forest is swald. Swalda (or Sualda) was king of Meirionydd in Wales in the early 7th century.

Forests in Latin is silvae. Forests in Old English is wealda.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for forests is now seldu.

feama : rivers

The Illunse word for rivers (plural) is feama. The word for river is feam. Feama is a rare first name.

Rivers in Latin is flumenis. Rivers in Old English is éa.

Here are two more nominative case plurals. In this case, the plurals were formed by adding -a.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Lake, in my words (revised) + lakes

lare : lake

The Illunse word for lake is lare. Lare is a last name. Lare is an obsolete English word for lore, learning. Lare is another obsolete English word for pasture, feed. Similar word lares (singular lar) were ancient Roman protective deities. Lare is the name of cities in Kenya, Ghana, Honduras and Mozambique.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for lake which is lacus (basin/tank/tub; lake/pond; reservoir/cistern/basin), and the Old English word for lake mere (sea, ocean; lake, pond, pool, cistern).

My previous Illunse word for lake was lece.

Here's a link to Lake, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

lareas : lakes

The Illunse word for lakes is lareas. Lareas is a rare last name.

Monday, July 12, 2010

Tree, in my words + trees

arbeo : tree

The Illunse word for tree is arbeo. Arbeo is a last name. Arbeo of Freising (died 784) was a German Bishop.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tree which is arbor, and the Old English word for tree which is tréow.

arbeon : trees

The Illunse word for trees is arbeon.

Arbeon is a nominative case plural. The ending for this plural doesn't follow given that trees in Latin is arboris and trees in Old English is tréowu. It makes some sense if you change the grammatical gender of the noun tree, but never mind that. The -n ending is used for other Old English plurals.

I've changed these words. My Illunse word for tree is now tebor, trees is teboru.

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Give me an A...

In Illunse, pronounce a as in father.

Both Latin and Old English have this as one of their two ways to pronounce a. The Latin ā (a macron) and the Old English á (long a) are both pronounced like a in father.

For now, this will be the only way to pronounce a in Illunse. I'll decide later if I want to add a second pronunciation...or not.

Friday, July 09, 2010

Flower, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya the word for flower is lótë or suffix -lot in compound words.

In Sindarin the words for flower are elloth and lotheg.

These words are for a single flower, not a head of flowers.

Thursday, July 08, 2010

Flower, in my words

flosta : flower

The Illunse word for flower is flosta. Flosta is a rare last name. Flosta is the name of a former municipality in Norway. Flosta is the name of a town in Sweden.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for flower which is flos (flower, blossom), and the Old English word for flower which is blóstma (blossom, bloom, flower).

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for flower is now flost.

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

They, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya the pronominal ending for they is -ntë or -ltë. Tolkien apparently used both of them in his manuscripts.

I didn't find a Sindarin word for they.

This ends nominative case personal pronouns. Yea! Thinking about pronouns, especially Tolkien's, made my head ache.

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

They, in my words

eha : they (pronoun)

The Illunse word for they (personal pronoun, 3rd person plural, nominative case) is eha. Eha is a last name. Eha is a masculine first name from India. In Estonian eha means twilight. Eha Amufu is a city in Nigeria.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for they which is híe, and the Latin words for they which are ei (masculine plural they), eae (feminine plural they) and ea (neuter plural they).

I thought that I would start this word with E because Latin does and I started the other 3rd person nominative pronouns with H, like Old English.

Saturday, July 03, 2010

Say what?

I don't really know how to pronounce all these constructed words in Illunse. There, I've admitted it. Although I arrogantly think that words should be pronounced one way or another, I've never established any rules.

Perhaps I should have figured out phonetics first, and not concentrated on word spelling. A linguist might have done that, but I'm an amateur. I'm learning things as I go. I'm still new at this language construction stuff.

In Latin each of the five vowels, A E I O U, can be pronounced two ways. These are differentiated by a macron or horizontal line over the letter in the Latin textbook I have. In Old English each of these vowels has an accented and an unaccented version. This means that, at worst, there are four possible ways to pronounce a vowel. Guess I need to research the possibilities.

(Postscript - I actually do know how to pronounce words in Fennas, my other constructed language)

Thursday, July 01, 2010

You (plural), in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya you (plural) may be ellë or perhaps the same as the you (singular) pronominal ending which is -lyë.

I think I'm getting confounded by Quenya grammar.

I didn't find a Sindarin word for you (plural).

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

You (plural), in my words

ves : you (pronoun)

The Illunse word for you (personal pronoun, 2nd person plural, nominative case) is ves. Ves is an uncommon last name. In Czech ves means village. Ves is the name of cities in India and the Czech Republic.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for you (plural) which is vos, and the Old English word for you (plural) which is .

In many Old English words g later became y, which should help in recognizing that gé is a precursor to ye.

Monday, June 28, 2010

We, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya the word for we is emmë and the corresponding pronominal ending -mmë, or elmë and the corresponding pronominal ending -lmmë, or the pronominal ending -lvë. Tolkien had different words for we depending if it included you (the person or persons spoken to) or not. Apparently in grammar this is called inclusive and exclusive we, something I learned. The last suffix may be for we when it means you (singular) and I. Tolkien also changed his mind about these pronouns for we. Pronouns are a less certain area in Quenya.

I didn't find a Sindarin word for we.

Sunday, June 27, 2010

We, in my words

wos : we (pronoun)

The Illunse word for we (personal pronoun, 1st person plural, nominative case) is wos. Wos is a last name. In Old English wós means sap, juice. Wos is the name of a town in Indonesia.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for we which is nos, and the Old English word for we which is we (same as Modern English).

Sorry I didn't do a post for Saturday this week, the day when I usually post miscellaneous stuff. Things were busy around here.

Friday, June 25, 2010

Rings, in my words

angas : rings

The Illunse word for rings is angas. Angas is a last name. In Tagalog angas means arrogant, proud. Angas (or Ngas) is a language of Nigeria. Angas is the name of cities in the Philippines, Peru and Ecuador.

Rings in Latin is anuli. Rings in Old English is hringas.

I wanted to know what the word for rings would be in Illunse, so I decided to construct the nominative plural. This word follows the Old English plural.

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Ring, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya the word for ring is corma. This word is only attested in compound forms, such as cormacolindo which means Ring-bearer.

I didn't find a Sindarin word for ring.

You would think that Tolkien would have words for ring, what with his books The Lord of the Rings!

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Ring, in my words

ang : ring

The Illunse word for ring is ang. Ang is a last name. In Frisian ang means sheen, brilliance. In Sindarin ang means iron. In Tagalog ang means the. ANG is the ISO 639-3 code for Old English. Ang is the name of towns in Sweden and Cambodia.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for ring which is anulus, and the Old English word for ring which is hring.

I know that this word is short, only three letters, but I preferred it to other Latin and Old English letter mixes. If I chose to, I can change it later.

Saturday, June 19, 2010

Bright Star, a movie review

Bright StarThis week I saw the movie Bright Star. It's a romance telling the story of the renowned English poet John Keats and Fanny Brawne, a couple who cared deeply for each other but fate ultimately kept apart. The setting was England about 1820. It features period costumes and, of course, poetry. The movie stars Ben Whishaw as John Keats and Abbie Cornish as Fanny Brawne, with Paul Schneider as Charles Armitage Brown.

Bright Star was released in 2009, and it played several art film theaters around town. I wanted to see it then, as I admire Keats' poetry, but didn't. I borrowed the DVD from the public library, after being on a lengthy waitlist, and I'm glad I did. The love story was touching, emotional, and a bit unconventional. The ending was quite sad, but I knew that going in. I would recommend Bright Star, it's a well-made, interesting to see, movie.

Friday, June 18, 2010

Seas, in my words

maerae : seas

The Illunse word for seas is maerae. The word for sea is maera. Maerae is a rare last name.

Seas in Latin is maris. Seas in Old English is sae (same as sea).

Here is another type of plural. And this time I'm using that leeway with letters, as there aren't two E available in the Latin and Old English plurals.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for seas is now maera.

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Fields and valleys, in my words

falga : fields

The Illunse word for fields is falga. The word for field is falg. Falga is the name of a small city in France and a town in Chad.

Fields in Latin is agri. Fields in Old English is felda.

dalla : valleys

The Illunse word for valleys is dalla. The word for valley is dalle. In Catalan dalla means scythe. In Cornish dalla means blind. Dalla is the name of cities in Burma, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India and Nigeria.

Valleys in Latin is vallis. Valleys in Old English is dena.

Here are two more nominative case plurals. Notice that these plurals don't end in S. I mention the Latin and Old English words, although my words are not necessarily an alphabetic mix of them. With plurals I'm giving myself a little more leeway with letters.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for valleys is now dallan.

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Hill, in my words (revised) + hills

holl : hill

The Illunse word for hill is holl. Holl is a last name. In Breton holl means all, totally. In Welsh holl means whole, all. Holl is the name of cities in Germany and Czech Republic. Holl is the name of towns in Iceland.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for hill which is collis and the Old English word for hill which is hyll.

My previous word for hill was cyll. I liked the spelling of that word but I didn't like that the pronunciation would be similar to kill. Holl is very nearly hill, but that's OK.

Here's a link to Hill, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

hollas : hills

The Illunse word for hills is hollas. Hollas is a last name.

This is a plural, in the nominative case. I formed this plural by adding a suffix of -as, but don't take that as a rule for plurals in Illunse because it isn't.

Monday, June 14, 2010

It, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya the word ta can mean it (that). The word se is the 3rd person singular pronouns he, she and it (living things) and also him, her, and it. The corresponding word for it (inaimate things) is sa. The pronominal ending -s means he/him, she/her, it.

The Sindarin word for it is ha (hana).

Pronouns are a somewhat fuzzy area for both Quenya and Sindarin. Although I found these words in dictionaries that I trust, pronouns are a poorly attested feature of these elven languages.

Although pronouns are important grammatically, I'd rather do something else, as far as words go. I'll return to pronouns again later.

Sunday, June 13, 2010

It, in my words

hid : it (pronoun)

The Illunse word for it (personal pronoun, 3rd person singular, nominative case) is hid. Hid is a last name. In English hid is the simple past of hide. In Danish hid means here. Hid is the name of a city in Pakistan.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for it which is id, and the Old English word for it which is hít.

As far as word mixtures, I chose hid instead of dit. I thought it would be nice to have all the 3rd person singular nominative pronouns start with H, as in Old English.

Saturday, June 12, 2010

A proverb, words in Latin

Time for another Latin proverb. I haven't done one of these for a while.

Latin proverb : Aliquando et insanire jucundum est

English translation : "It is fun to do something foolish every now and then"

Friday, June 11, 2010

She, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya the word se is the 3rd person singular pronouns he, she and it (living things) and also him, her, and it. The pronominal ending -s means he/him, she/her, it.

The Sindarin word for she is he (hen, hene). By the way, the Sindarin word he is apparently pronounced not as hee but as heh.

Thursday, June 10, 2010

She, in my words

hea : she (pronoun)

The Illunse word for she (personal pronoun, 3rd person singular, nominative case) is hea. Hea is a last name. In Estonian hea means good. HEA is shorthand slang term for Happily Ever After.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for she which is ea, and the Old English word for she which is héo.

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

He, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya he (3rd person singular pronoun) is the pronominal ending -ro. The word se is the 3rd person singular pronouns he, she and it (living things) and also him, her, and it. The pronominal ending -s means he/him, she/her, it.

The Sindarin word for he is ho (hon, hono).

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

He, in my words

hei : he (pronoun)

The Illunse word for he (personal pronoun, 3rd person singular, nominative case) is hei. Hei is a last name. In Finnish and Norwegian hei means hi (interjection). Hei is the name of cities in the Netherlands, North Korea, Belgium, Indonesia and South Korea.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for he which is is, and the Old English word for he which is (masculine pronoun).

I considered making my word hie, but híe means they in Old English, it's another pronoun.

Monday, June 07, 2010

You (singular), in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

In Quenya you (thou, thee, you; formal/polite 2nd person singular) is lye or elyë or the pronominal ending -lyë.

In Quenya you (you, thou, thee; intimate/familar 2nd person singular) is tye or the pronominal ending -tyë.

This word got me into some Quenya grammar. I know about formal and informal versions of you, from Spanish. But pronominal suffixes?!?

I didn't find a Sindarin word for you or thou.

Sunday, June 06, 2010

You (singular), in my words

thu : you (pronoun)

The Illunse word for you (personal pronoun, 2nd person singular, nominative case) is thu. In Etruscan thu means one. In Scottish Gaelic thu means you (singular informal). In Vietnamese thu means autumn. Thu is an abbreviation for Thursday. Thû is an early name for Sauron in J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for you (singular) which is tu, and the Old English word for you (singular) which is þu which I transliterate to thu.

My Illunse word is basically the same as the Old English word, I just don't use the letter thorn (þ) to spell it. It's interesting that this word means you in Scottish Gaelic. Perhaps that confirms that my word choice was a good one. Not that I had many word mix choices, the Latin and Old English words are so similar.

Saturday, June 05, 2010

More song lyrics from The Only Ones

Two weeks ago I posted some lyrics from the song "From Here to Eternity" by The Only Ones. Here are some more lyrics from the same song. These words start the song, they are the first verse, and they precede the lyrics which I posted earlier.
I see a woman with death in her eyes
But I don't have the time to pray
For her salvation or for her soul
She walks her chosen way
But in the darkness and in the light
I have found some hope
Of me getting out from this underground
I can't wait to get back home, back home
I haven't done any writing yet, if you're curious. I've had a busy week.

Friday, June 04, 2010

I, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for I (1st person singular pronoun) is ni.

The Sindarin word for I (1st person singular pronoun) is im.

Thursday, June 03, 2010

I, in my words

ico : I (pronoun)

The Illunse word for I (personal pronoun, 1st person singular, nominative case) is ico. Ico is a last name. Ico is a PlayStation 2 action-adventure game. Ico is an unusual first name that can be masculine or feminine. Ico is the name of a city in Angola.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for I which is ego, and the Old English word for I which is ic.

This month I'll be defining some pronouns, which will get me involved with grammar.

Monday, May 31, 2010

Uncle (maternal), in my words

amunce : uncle (maternal)

The Illunse word for uncle (maternal uncle, mother's brother) is amunce.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for uncle (maternal uncle, mother's brother, mother's sister's husband) which is avunculus, and the Old English word for uncle (maternal) which is éam.

Sunday, May 30, 2010

Uncle (paternal), in my words

padreru : uncle (paternal)

The Illunse word for uncle (paternal uncle, father's brother) is padreru.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for uncle (paternal uncle, father's brother) which is patruus, and the Old English word for uncle (paternal) which is fædera which I transliterate to faedera.

Note that both the Latin and the Old English words for uncle (father's brother) begin similar to their word for father. In Illunse my word for father is pader.

No aunt or uncle in Tolkien's words. I couldn't find Quenya or Sindarin words for aunt or uncle.

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Things to do this summer

This summer I need to sit down and do some writing. No excuses. I've mentioned to several people that I've been writing, perhaps because I'd like to believe that I’m accomplishing something, when actually I haven't written any fiction in months.

The fragment that I wrote back in January was a bit of a mess, and somewhat discouraging. But in hindsight, it was a learning experience. I should continue writing. Try writing something else. They say writers generally write hundreds of thousands of words of garbage before they write anything truly good. I'm still working through my quota of garbage.

Friday, May 28, 2010

Aunt (maternal), in my words

modrera : aunt (maternal)

The Illunse word for aunt (maternal aunt, mother’s sister) is modrera. In Spanish and in Italian similar word modera is a conjugation of the verb meaning to moderate or to curb.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for aunt (maternal) which is matertera, and the Old English word for aunt (maternal) which is módrige.

In both Latin and Old English the beginning of the word resembles the word for mother. My Illunse word for mother is moder.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Aunt (paternal), in my words

amithu : aunt (paternal)

The Illunse word for aunt (paternal aunt, father’s sister) is amithu. Amithu is possibly a first name in India.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for aunt (paternal) which is amita, and the Old English word for aunt (paternal) which is faðu which I transliterate to fathu.

Interestingly, both Latin and Old English have separate words for paternal aunt and maternal aunt. I wonder if making this distinction was once important? I will go along with this concept in Illunse.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Child, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for child are hína and seldë (an earlier Quenya word).

The Sindarin word for child is hên (child).

Monday, May 24, 2010

Child, in my words

inil : child

The Illunse word for child (infant) is inil. Inil is a rare first name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for child which is infans (child, infant), and the Old English word for child which is cild (child, infant; a youth of gentle birth).

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Song lyrics from The Only Ones

Here are some lyrics from the song "From Here to Eternity" by The Only Ones. The song was written by Peter Perrett, the band's vocalist. The Only Ones were English Power Pop or New Wave band from the late 1970s. They are an interesting and influential band, and have a cult following.
Such a tender age to sell her soul
For dreams that don't come true
She's like a woman whose whole life has dissolved
She's the living proof
That all that glitters is not gold
And even serpents shine

Friday, May 21, 2010

Boy, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for boy or youth are seldo (boy) and nessë (youth).

The Sindarin words for youth (boy) is nîth.

Youth is a word that means a young person, but historically it seems to especially apply to a young man or boy.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Boy, in my words

paern : boy

The Illunse word for boy is paern. Paern is an uncommon last name that can be Estonian.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for boy which is puer (boy, lad, young man; servant; male child), and the Old English word for boy which is cnapa (child, youth; servant).

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Girl, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for girl are wen (girl, maid) and nettë (girl, daughter).

The Sindarin words for girl are iell (girl, daughter, maid) and sell (girl, daughter, maid).

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Girl, in my words

pelda : girl

The Illunse word for girl is pelda. Pelda is an unusual last name. In Hungarian similar word példa means example (something serving to explain or illustrate a rule).

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for girl which is puella (girl, female child / daughter; maiden), and the Old English word for girl which is mægden (or mæden) (maiden, virgin; girl; maid, servant) which I transliterate to maegden.

I meant to post this word last night, but was I just too tired. I've been busy lately.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

The Eve of St. Agnes, stanza six, words by Keats

"The Eve of St. Agnes" is a long poem (42 stanzas) by John Keats which was first published in 1820. As I've recently posted words for woman and maiden, I thought I'd feature a stanza from this fine poem. This is stanza 6 (or VI in Roman numerals).
They told her how, upon St. Agnes’ Eve,
Young virgins might have visions of delight,
And soft adorings from their loves receive
Upon the honey’d middle of the night,
If ceremonies due they did aright;
As, supperless to bed they must retire,
And couch supine their beauties, lily white;
Nor look behind, nor sideways, but require
Of Heaven with upward eyes for all that they desire.
Keats based his poem on the superstition that a girl could see her future husband in a dream if she performed certain rites on the eve of St. Agnes.

Thursday, May 13, 2010

Maiden, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for maiden is vendë (maiden, girl).

The Sindarin word for maiden is dess (young woman).

The suffix -wen also means maiden in apparently both Quenya and Sindarin. It's a frequent ending in feminine names, such as Eärwen which means "Sea-maiden".

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Maiden, in my words

femire : maiden

The Illunse word for maiden is femire. Femire is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for maiden which is fǽmne (maid, virgin, bride) which I transliterate to faemne, and the Latin word for maiden which is virgo (maiden, young woman, girl of marriageable age; virgin).

Nowadays we don't tend to speak of maidens, except in poetry and Shakespearian plays. But Old English and Latin, which are antiquated languages, most definitely differentiate between women and maidens.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Woman, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for woman is nís.

The Sindarin word for woman is bess (woman; wife).

Monday, May 10, 2010

Woman, in my words

mewir : woman

The Illunse word for woman is mewir. Mewir is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for woman which is mulier (woman; wife; mistress), and the Old English word for woman which is wíf (woman, female, lady; wife).

Both the Latin word and the Old English word can be translated as married woman. But for Illunse, I will make this word more general, simply woman. Note that my word for man is wir.

Saturday, May 08, 2010

Bible Trace, from 1 Thessalonians

Last Saturday I finished sharing Tolkien's Markirya Poem. Today I have another Bible Trace. A verse from different Bibles through the ages.

Today's Bible Trace is 1 Thessalonians Chapter 5, Verse 10. I didn't compile this information myself, I found this interesting verse online. After the date is the version of the Bible from which the verse was taken. And no, I still can't read Old English, even though there are a few readable words.

Latin 405 Vulgate
Qui mortuus est pro nobis ut sive vigilemus sive dormiamus simul cum illo vivamus

Old English 990 West Saxon
He swealt for us swa þæt, sam we wæccað sam slapað, we lifen ætgædre mid him.

Middle English 1395 Wyclif
That whether we waken, whether we slepen, we lyue togidere with him.

Jacobean English 1611 King James
Who died for us, that, whether we wake or sleep, we should live together with him.

Basic English 1964 Ogden
Who was put to death for us, so that, awake or sleeping, we may have a part in his life.

Friday, May 07, 2010

Oak, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for oak is norno.

The Sindarin word for oak is doron.

Thursday, May 06, 2010

Oak, in my words

erc : oak

The Illunse word for oak (oak-tree) is erc. Erc of Dalriada was a 5th century Irish king.This word is a mixture of the Old English word for oak which is ác, and the Latin word for oak which is quercus.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for oak is now aerc.

Tuesday, May 04, 2010

Hail, in my words

hagro : hail

The Illunse word for hail (hail-storm) is hagro. Hagro is a rare last name. HAGRO is the name of several companies in The Netherlands.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for hail which is hagol, and the Latin word for hail which is grando.

Tolkien does not have words for hail (hail-storm) in Sindarin or Quenya. Although in Quenya there's words for hail as an interjection, like in Hail Mary.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for hail is now hagor.

Sunday, May 02, 2010

Shining white, in my words

icand : shining white

The Illunse word for the color shining white is icand. ICAND is an acronym for International Conference on Applications in Nonlinear Dynamics.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for shining white which is candidus, and the Old English word for white which is hwit. I'll admit it's a mixture with many more letters from the Latin word.

I made this word purposely to be somewhat similar to the Modern English word incandescent, which is derived from Latin. In Old English, similar word ícend means one who increases or augments.

This word does not replace abith as my word for white. This is a another, a second word, for white. Latin has two words for white -- albus and candidus.

In Latin candidus donotes a bright, shining, pure, clean, even transparent, white. Latin word albus is white, but white without lustre, pale, even colorless, but it's also a favorable or fortunate color.

Here's a link to White, in J.R.R Tolkien's words. It appears that Tolkien had words for shining white.

Saturday, May 01, 2010

Markirya fifth stanza, words in Quenya

This is the last stanza, five of five, of The Markirya poem. This poem is an important piece of the Quenya language.

Here is the fifth stanza of Tolkien's Markirya Poem in Quenya:
Man tiruva rácina cirya
ondolissë mornë
nu fanyarë rúcina,
anar púrëa tihta
axor ilcalannar
métim' auressë?
Man cenuva métim' andúnë?
Here's Tolkien's translation of the fifth stanza:
Who shall heed a broken ship
on the black rocks
under broken skies,
a bleared sun blinking
on bones gleaming
in the last morning?
Who shall see the last evening?

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Blue, in my words (revised)

cealu : blue

The Illunse word for the color blue is cealu. Cealu is possibly a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for blue which can be bleó (bleó also means color, appearance, form) or the Middle English word for blue blewe, and the Latin word for blue caeruleus.

My previous word for blue was berl. After much thought, I decided to change this word.

Here's a link to Blue, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Sky, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for sky are ilwë (sky, heavens), menel (sky, the heavens, the firmament; the apparent dome in the sky), and vilya (air, sky).

The Sindarin words for sky is menel (sky, high heaven, firmament, the region of the stars).

Monday, April 26, 2010

Sky, in my words

haelom : sky

The Illunse word for sky (heaven) is haelom. Haelom is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for sky which is heofon (sky, firmament; heaven) and the Latin word for sky which is caelum (the sky, heaven, heavens).

In Old English similar word hǽlu means health, prosperity, salvation.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for sky is now haelon.

Sunday, April 25, 2010

Rain, in my words (revised)

revia : rain

The Illunse word for rain is revia. Revia is an unusual last name. Revia can be a variation of the feminine first name Reva. Revia is a brand-name presciption drug. In Sindarin revia- is a (possibly obsolete) verb meaning to fly, sail; to wander. Revia is the name of a town in Mozambique.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for rain which is regn and the Latin word for rain which is pluvia (rain, shower).

My previous word for rain was rewia. A minor change. In that word I transliterated the V in the Latin word to W. I decided I'd rather keep the V instead.

Here's a link to Rain, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Markirya fourth stanza, words in Quenya

Contining with The Markirya poem, this is stanza four of five. This poem is an important piece of the Quenya language.

Here is the fourth stanza of Tolkien's Markirya Poem in Quenya:
Man cenuva lumbor ahosta
Menel acúna
ruxal' ambonnar,
ëar amortala,
undumë hácala,
enwina lúmë
elenillor pella
talta-taltala
atalantië mindonnar?
Here's Tolkien's translation of the fourth stanza:
Who shall see the clouds gather,
the heavens bending
upon crumbling hills,
the sea heaving,
the abyss yawning,
the old darkness
beyond the stars
falling
upon fallen towers?
Notice that the first line includes the Quenya word for clouds, specifically dark clouds. Yesterday's post featured Tolkien's words for cloud.

Friday, April 23, 2010

Cloud, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for cloud are fanya (cloud; white cloud) and lumbo (dark cloud).

The Sindarin words for cloud are faun (cloud) and fân (veil; cloud (applied to clouds floating as veils over the blue sky or the sun or moon or resting on hills)).

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Cloud, in my words

nulce : cloud

The Illunse word for cloud is nulce. Nulce is an unusual last name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for cloud which is nubes (a cloud, mist, vapor), and the Old English word for cloud which is wolcen (a cloud; ball, lump; sky, heavens).

There's another Old English word for cloud, wederwolcen, which according to the big Bosworth-Toller Anglo-Saxon Dictionary means a fine weather cloud. The first half of that word, weder, means weather.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Wind, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for wind are súrë and vaiwa.

The Sindarin words for wind are gwaew and sûl.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Wind, in my words

wend : wind

The Illunse word for wind is wend. In English wend means to direct one's course or way. Wend is a last name. Wend is an unusual masculine first name. Wend may be a nickname for Wendy.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for wind which is wind (same as Modern English), and the Latin word for wind which is ventus.

It may seem that this word is not much of a mix, a lazy choice on my part. But I considered and rejected using similar words such as went, vend, wint, and vint. And I didn't want to make this word an unintelligible mix such as nidevu.

Sunday, April 18, 2010

Yellow, in my words (revised)

faego : yellow

The Illunse word for the color yellow is faego. Faego is an unusual word, it's sometimes a misspelling of Fargo.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for yellow which is geolu (or geolo), and the Latin word for yellow flavus (gold colored, yellow).

I know that I just revised yellow last week. Sorry, but I've changed my mind again. My previous word for yellow was feolu.

Here's a link to Yellow, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

That's enough with colors.

Saturday, April 17, 2010

Markirya third stanza, words in Quenya

Contining with The Markirya poem, this is stanza three of five. This poem is an important piece of the Quenya language.

Here is the third stanza of Tolkien's Markirya Poem in Quenya:
Man hlaruva rávëa súrë
ve tauri lillassië,
ninqui carcar yarra
isilmë ilcalassë,
isilmë pícalassë,
isilmë lantalassë
ve loicolícuma;
raumo nurrua,
undumë rúma?
Here's Tolkien's translation of the third stanza:
Who shall hear the wind roaring
like leaves of forests;
the white rocks snarling
in the moon gleaming,
in the moon waning,
in the moon falling
a corpse-candle;
the storm mumbling,
the abyss moving?

Friday, April 16, 2010

Dead black, in my words

trase : dead black

The Illunse word for the color dead black is trase. Trase is a last name. In Albanian trase means track. In Creole trase means trace, sketch. In Croatian trase means route. In Latvian means circuit or track.

Trase does not replace my previous word for black, nelc. This is another, a second word, for black. Both Old English and Latin have two separate words for black. I wouldn't have thought to make this up!

This word for dead black is a mixture of the Latin word for black (black, dark; coal-black; gloomy; malicious) which is ater, and the Old English word for black (swarthy, black, dark; gloomy; evil) which is sweart.

By the way, my other word for black is a mixture of the Latin word niger and the Old English word blæc.

Dead black is a more sinister color than mere black.

An 19th century Latin synonym dictionary I found on the web described the difference between the two Latin words like this: niger is the darkest color and makes a positive, imposing and beautiful impression; ater is a negation of color and makes a dismal and dark impression.

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Violet, in my words

hacwin : violet

The Illunse word for the color violet is hacwin. Hacwin is an unusual word.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for violet (or a purplish blue) which is hyacinthinus and the Old English word for a dark color which can be violet hǽwen (blue, purple, azure, green), which I transliterate to haewen.

It's perhaps a bit of a stretch to construct this word for violet. The Latin and Old English words that I'm using are not all that common.

I didn't use the Latin word purpura, which is like our word purple, because that word is for Tyrian purple - also known as royal purple or imperial purple - which is actually more of a dark red or maroon color.

I didn't find any words for the color violet in Sindarin or Quenya.

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Gray, in my words (revised)

gaur : gray

The Illunse word for gray (grey) is gaur. The Gaur is a large, dark-coated, bovine animal of South Asia and Southeast Asia. Gaur is last name. In Basque gaur means today. In Sindarin gaur means werewolf. Gaur is the name of cities in Nepal, India and Malaysia.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for gray which is glaucus (bluish gray) and the Old English word for gray which is græg.

I'm changing this word because I found a more appropriate Latin word for gray. Earlier I used the Latin word canus, which means gray but primarily for gray hair, and hence also means aged and hoary. My previous Illunse word for gray was ceag.

It's somewhat confounding for me to find definitive color words in Latin. Not because there are too few words for colors, but rather too many. There are words for a wide assortment of shades and hues.

Here's a link to Gray, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words