Sunday, January 31, 2010

Water, in my words (revised)

acwe : water

The Illunse word for water is acwe.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for water which is aqua, and the Old English word for water which is wæter. The c comes from transliterating the Latin QU in aqua to CW.

My previous Illunse word for water was aece. If you look sideways at acwe, my new word for water, it resembles the Latin word.

Thank you for following, Kiki!

Here's a link to Water, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for water is now awer.

Saturday, January 30, 2010

What's next

I've decided what sort of words I'll be constructing next!

In February I'm going to make words for . . . things in a home. Kendrabelle's suggestion. Words like room, window, rug, and bed. As I'm constructing words from Latin and Old English, two ancient languages, the things in a home won't include any modern inventions, just basic stuff.

Then in March, I'm going to make adjectives. Mariska's suggestion. I could definitely use words for such as big, small, good, and tall. Not counting colors, I only have a handful of describing words.

Thank you Kendrabelle and Mariska for your comments! I appreciate knowing I have some readers.

I better get back to my writing. I resolved to write 3,000 words of my novel by the end of this month. So far I've written just over 2,000 words. Bye!

Friday, January 29, 2010

Man, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for man is nér (man, adult male - elf, mortal, or of other speaking race). The Quenya word quendu means elf-man.

It seems that the Sindarin words for man is benn (man, male, husband). There's another Sindarin word, which is apparently archaic, dîr (man, adult male - elf, mortal, or of any other speaking race). The Sindarin word adan means Man as a people or a mortal man. The Sindarin word ellon means elf-man.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

Man, in my words

wir : man

The Illunse word for man (adult male human) is wir. Wir is a last name. In German wir means we. In Old English wír means wire, metal thread. Wir is the name of a city in Poland.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for man which is wer (male being; man; husband; hero), and the Latin word for man which is vir (man; husband; hero; person of courage, honor, and nobility).

The Old English word wer may seem odd, but it's part of the root of our word werewolf. In Old English the word werwulf literally means man-wolf.

Initially, I considered making this word ver, instead of wir. But I saw that ver means worm in French, a somewhat unpleasant meaning in a widely spoken language, and so I scratched that idea.

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Person, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for person (one,(some)body, person, individual, man or woman) is quén.

There doesn't seem to be a Sindarin word for person. In Sindarin there are words for human being, as opposed to elf, which translate to follower, born later, Second People, and mortal. Not quite the same as person.

Monday, January 25, 2010

Person, in my words

nom : person

The Illunse word for person (human being) is nom. Nom is a last name. In Catalan nom means name or noun. In French nom means a name, especially a last name or family name. In Tibetan (Transliterated) nom means to enjoy, to hold, to keep, to seize, to smell, to take pleasure in. Nom is the name of cities in Vietnam and Nigeria. Nóm is a name given to elf Finrod Felagund (Galadriel's brother) in Tolkien's The Silmarillion.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for person which is mann (person (male or female); man; mankind; brave man), and the Latin word for person which is homo (man, human being, person, fellow).

The Latin word homo is as in homo sapiens.

Saturday, January 23, 2010

Where to from here?

What sort of words should I construct for Illunse, and look up in Tolkien's languages of Quenya and Sindarin?

1. places in a town (house, street, castle, walls)
2. things in a home (door, window, rug, bed)
3. equipment of a warrior (sword, dagger, armor, spear)
4. trees and plants (oak, maple, wheat, flower)
5. interrogatives (where, what, when, who)
6. pronouns (he, she, this, that)
7. parts of the body (head, heart, hand, foot)
8. adjectives (big, small, good, evil)

If any of you readers out there have a preference, let me know. This is your chance to influence the direction of this blog. I'll pick what to do, where to go next, a week from now.

There are currently 142 words, according to the blog's count, in the fantasy language of Illunse, the language which is spoken in the land Illun. I have a list of words, but I can't write simple sentence or form any plurals.

I resolved to look at what to do about those plurals in February. If you haven't guessed by now, plurals in Illunse won't be made by adding a suffix of -s or -es, as in English.

I'll continue constructing words in Illunse, and looking up those words in Tolkien's languages of Quenya and Sindarin. Though probably I won't be posting quite as often. I think I've posted nearly every day this month!

Friday, January 22, 2010

Daughter, in my words (again)

dotia : daughter

The Illunse word for daughter is dotia. Dotia is an unusual feminine first name. Dotia is an uncommon last name. Dotia is the name of towns in Greece and Liberia.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for daughter which is dohtor (daughter; female descendant), and the Latin word for daughter which is filia.

My previous word for daughter, from earlier this month, was foldir. That word unfortunately made me think of a folder, like one of the manila folders in my desk.

I'm redoing this word because I realized that my words for son and daughter don't need to be similiar. OK, they are similar in Latin (filius and filia), but I can follow the example of Old English instead. The Old English words for son and daughter (sunu and dohtor) aren't similar.

Here's a link to Daughter, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Hundred, in my words (again)

cethund : hundred

The Illunse word for hundred (100) is cethund.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for hundred which is centum, and the Old English word for hundred which is hundred (same as Modern English) or hundtéontig (ten decades?).

My previous Illunse word for hundred was hentund. Somehow that word didn't work for me. I decided to start the word with C, like the Latin word. In Roman numerals, C stands for a hundred. Not that I want to deal with Roman numerals in Illunse!

There are no Quenya or Sindarin numbers for hundred.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for hundred is now hucent.

Monday, January 18, 2010

Stone, in my words (revised)

stal : stone

The Illunse word for stone is stal. Stal is a last name. In Dutch stal translates to stable, stall. In Polish stal translates to steel. In Danish and Norwegian stål translates to steel. Stal is the name of a city in Belgium.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for stone which is stán, and the Latin word for a stone which is lapis.

My previous Illunse word for stone was stala. I dropped the final a. I think that stal looks stronger than stala. Could it be because stal means steel in several other languages? And despite looking like the Old English word, stal takes just as many letters from the Latin word.

Here's a link to Stone, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Sunday, January 17, 2010

Mother, in my words (revised)

moder : mother

The Illunse word for mother is moder. Moder is a last name. In Danish moder translates to mother. In Swedish and Norwegian moder is a word meaning mother that is likely archaic. In Slovenian moder means blue.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for mother which is módor and the Latin word for mother which is mater.

My previous word for mother was mader. After some consideration, I decided to change the first vowel from A to O to make my Illunse word for mother less like my word for father, which is pader. I'm making this change even though it makes the new word not as good of an alphabetic mix.

Here's a link to Mother, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Friday, January 15, 2010

Spouse, in my words

cenacg : spouse

The Illunse word for spouse is cenacg.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for spouse which is conjux (spouse / mate / consort; husband / wife / bride / fiancee / intended; concubine), and the Old English word for spouse which is gemæcca (mate, equal, one of a pair, comrade, companion; husband, wife).

When looking in the dictionaries for Latin and Old English words for wife and husband, I found these words spouse. I wasn't originally planning to make a word for spouse, but I thought these words were too good not to be used. As well as meaning spouse, cenacg in Illunse will be translatable to mate, consort, life partner and significant other.

Tolkien doesn't seem to have words in Quenya or Sindarin with quite this meaning, which applies to either husband or wife.

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Husband, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for husband is venno.

The Sindarin words for husband is hervenn.

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Husband, in my words

mearl : husband

The Illunse word for husband is mearl. Mearl is an unusual last name. Mearl is rare first name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for husband which is maritus (husband, married man; lover; mate), and the Old English word for husband which is ceorl (freeman; man, hero; a (married) man, husband; peasant, rustic).

Some of my words are not at all like Modern English, this is one of them.

I've changed this word. I found a more apropriate Old English word. My Illunse word for husband is now marond.

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Wife, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for wife is vessë.

The Sindarin words for wife are bess ((young) woman; wife) and hervess (wife).

Monday, January 11, 2010

Wife, in my words

wifru : wife

The Illunse word for wife is wifru.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for wife which is wíf (woman, female, lady; wife) and the Latin word for wife which is uxor.

I made this word longer than the words in Old English and Latin. My word even starts with the Old English word for wife (minus an accent mark). Does it work as an Illunse word? Maybe better than other options such as wurf or wrix (wrics?).

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Son, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for son is yondo. The patronymic ending (son of...) is -ion.

The Sindarin word for son is ion (son; scion, male descendant) or iôn.

Saturday, January 09, 2010

Son, in my words

fulis : son

The Illunse word for son is fulis. Fulis is an unusual last name. Fulis is the name of a town in Papua New Guinea.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for son which is filius, and the Old English word for son which is sunu (son, descendant).

Fulis ends with the common letter s. Many nominative singular Latin nouns end with s. I haven't been ending many Illunse nouns this way.

Friday, January 08, 2010

Daughter, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for daughter are yeldë and yendë.

The Sindarin words for daughter (daughter; girl, maid) are sell and iell.

Tolkien revised his words too. The second words are the later defined words, but they may or may not replace the first word.

Thursday, January 07, 2010

Daughter, in my words

foldir : daughter

The Illunse word for daughter is foldir. Foldir is similar to the Old English word folde meaning earth, country.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for daughter which is filia, and the Old English word for daughter which is dohtor (daughter; female descendant).

Foldir is a new word, not a revised word. I still have a couple planned revisions, but I'll wait to do them later.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for daughter is now dotia.

Wednesday, January 06, 2010

Boar, in my words (revised)

veor : boar

The Illunse word for boar is veor. Veor is a rare last name. Veor Cove is a beach in Cornwall, UK.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for boar which is eofor (boar, wild boar, boar image on a helmet) or bár, and the Latin word for boar which is verres (boar, uncastrated male hog or swine; wild boar).

My previous Illunse word for boar was veore. I decided to drop the final e, which in Illunse is not silent.

Old English doesn't include the letter V, but Latin does.

Tuesday, January 05, 2010

Snake, in my words (revised)

snedre : snake

The Illunse word for snake is snedre. Snedre is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for snake nǽdre (adder, snake, serpent, viper, any kind of snake), and the Latin word for snake serpens (serpent, snake).

My previous Illunse word for snake was senerd. I decided to shuffle the letters into something harsher looking, perhaps more snake-like. Senerd looked vaguely French, nothing against the French, but I'm trying to look more like gnarly Old English.

If you're interested, here's link to my earlier post, Snake, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Monday, January 04, 2010

Dog, in my words (revised)

canud : dog

The Illunse word for dog is canud. Canud is a last name that can be French.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for dog which is canis and the Old English word for dog which is hund.

My previous Illunse word for dog was cnoda, which was constructed using the Old English word docga. I'm changing this word because I believe that the Old English word hund is the more common word for dog.

Here's a link to Dog, in Tolkien's words. Tolkien's words seem somewhat similar to hund.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for dog is now cund.

Sunday, January 03, 2010

Birthday, in my words

byrnadaes : birthday

The Illunse word for birthday is byrnadaes.

Today is J.R.R. Tolkien's birthday. He was born on the 3rd of January 1892 in what is now South Africa.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for birthday which is gebyrddæg and the Latin word for birthday which is natalis (birthday / anniversary; date of birth / founding / manufacture / origin; birthplace).

It was like mixing apples and oranges to come up with this word. I decided to follow the example of Old English and end the word with day (dæg is day in Old English, daes is day in Illunse). My word byrnadaes attempts to look like "born-day".

There doesn't seem to be any words for birthday in Quenya or Sindarin.

Saturday, January 02, 2010

Bear, in my words (revised)

bersu : bear

The Illunse word for bear is bersu. Bersu is a last name. Gerhard Bersu was a German archaeologist. Bersu can be a first name.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for bear which is bera and the Latin word for bear which is ursus.

My previous Illunse word for bear was brus. Unfortunately, that word was nearly the same as my word for brown which is brusc. I discovered this when updating the dictionary. I don't want to have a "brown bear" problem, so I'm changing the word for bear.

I've changed this word again. My Illunse word for bear is now bursa.

Friday, January 01, 2010

Resolutions for the new year

Happy New Year 2010!

I decided to share with you a couple of my New Year's resolutions. Sometimes I write resolutions, sometimes I don't. Some of my resolutions from previous years make me chuckle later.

1. Write 3,000 words of my novel by the end of January 2010. Just writing matters, not the quality. This word count is about 10-12 pages of manuscript, a mere fraction of NanoWriMo, but I think it would be a realistic challenge for me, as I haven't written much recently.

2. For Illunse, my constructed language, figure out how to make plurals in the nominative case by the end of February 2010. Currently I have nouns, but no plurals. I can tell you the Illunse word for cat, but not the word for cats. This resolution means doing some research on Old English and Latin grammar. Even fantasy languages need grammar.

We'll see how I do on these goals.