Saturday, October 30, 2010

Bible trace, from Mark

How about another Bible trace? This Bible verse, in Latin and various versions of English, is Mark Chapter 8, Verse 23.

I'm getting better at reading Middle English.

Latin, Vulgate - 405
et adprehendens manum caeci eduxit eum extra vicum et expuens in oculos eius inpositis manibus suis interrogavit eum si aliquid videret

Old English, West Saxon - 990
& þa æt-ran he þas blinden hand endlædde hine buton þa wic. & spætte on hiseagen. & his hand on asette & hine axode.hwæder he aht ge-seage.

Middle English, Wycliffe - 1395
And whanne he hadde take the blynde mannus hoond, he ledde hym out of the street, and spete in to hise iyen, and sette hise hoondis on hym; and he axide hym, if he saye ony thing.

Renaissance English, Tyndale - 1526
And he caught the blynde by the honde and leade him out of the toune and spat in his eyes and put his hondes apon him and axed him whether he saw ought.

Jacobean English, King James - 1611
And he took the blind man by the hand, and led him out of the town; and when he had spit on his eyes, and put his hands upon him, he asked him if he saw ought.

Basic English, Ogden - 1964
And he took the blind man by the hand, and went with him out of the town; and when he had put water from his mouth on his eyes, and put his hands on him, he said, Do you see anything?

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Tavern, in my words + taverns

tiwern : tavern

The Illunse word for tavern is tiwern.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tavern which is taberna (tavern, inn; shed; stall/booth; small shop), and the Old English word for tavern which is wínærn (tavern, cellar; drinking hall, wine hall).

tiwerna : taverns

The Illunse word for taverns (nominative plural) is tiwerna.

Taverns in Latin is tabernae. Taverns in Old English is wínærn.

Sorry for the less frequent blog postings. I've been rather busy lately.

Friday, October 22, 2010

Street, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + streets

The Quenya word for street is mallë (street, road), and the plural streets is maller.

The Sindarin words for street are othrad, which may be obsolete, and rath (course, riverbed; street). The words for the plural streets seem to be ethraid and raist.

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Street, in my words + streets

stape : street

The Illunse word for street is stape. Stape is a last name. Stape is a hamlet and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for street which is platea (broad way, street, avenue) and the Old English word for street which is strǽt (a road in a town, a street, a paved road, high road). (Note: the Old English word is from the Latin word strata which means spread, coverlet)

stapa : streets

The Illunse word for streets (nominative plural) is stapa. Stapa is a rare last name. In Lojban stapa means step. Stapa (aka Stapar) is the name of a place in Iceland.

Streets in Latin is plateae. Streets in Old English is stræta.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for street is now stae. Streets is now staea.

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Roads, in my words

weas : roads

The Illunse word for roads (nominative plural) is weas. Weas is a last name. In Old English wéas means by chance, accidentally. The Weas were a native tribe originally located in western Indiana.

Roads in Latin is viae. Roads in Old English is wegas.

Road (singular) in Illunse is wea, which is a mix of the Latin word (via) and Old English word (weg).

I think that's enough with plurals for existing words. I'll have to construct some new words. Hopefuly I'll also find some Quenya and Sindarin words.

I've changed this word. My Illunse word for roads is now weaga.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Temples, in my words

tealga : temples

The Illunse word for temples (nominative plural) is tealga.

Temples in Latin is templi. Temples in Old English is hearga.

Temple (singular) in Illunse is tealg, which is a mix of the Latin word (templum) and Old English word (hearg).

If you were watching closely, you might have noticed that I posted a revised word for temple. Decent enough word, but it didn't look quite right for Illunse. I trashed that and went back to my earlier word.

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Churches, in my words

clecian : churches

The Illunse word for churches (nominative plural) is clecian. In Welsh clecian means to snap, to crack, to click, to clack. Clecian is a rare last name.

Churches in Latin is ecclesiae. Churches in Old English is cirican.

Church (singular) in Illunse is clecia, which is a mix of the Latin word (ecclesia) and Old English word (cirice). In most towns there are mutliple churches.

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Houses, in my words

hudas : houses

The Illunse word for houses (nominative plural) is hudas. Hudas is an uncommon last name. In Tagalog hudas (from Judas) means to double-cross. Hudas is the name of a city in India.

Houses (and house) in Latin is domus. Houses (and house) in Old English is hús.

House (singular) in Illunse is hud, which is a mix of Latin and Old English words. In a town there are houses (plural).

Saturday, October 09, 2010

Next word building project - things in a town

My next Illunse word building project is going to be things in a town. As I'm using Old English and Latin words to construct my words, these will be words describing things found in a very backward, historical town. Basic terms. Don't expect to see words for shopping mall, traffic light, movie theater or car dealership.

I already have several words that fit this category. My word for house is hud. My word for church is clecia.

Following this project, I’ll likely take on interrogatives, question words, which I think will be complicated due to grammar.

Friday, October 08, 2010

Ankle, in my words + ankles

tacle : ankle

The Illunse word for ankle is tacle. Tacle is an uncommon last name. In French means tacle means tackle, tackling.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for ankle which is talus, and the Old English word for ankle which is ancléow.

tacli : ankles

The Illunse word for ankles (nominative plural) is tacli. Tacli is a rare last name.

Ankles in Latin is tali. Ankles in Old English is ancléow (same as ankle).

I couldn't find Quenya or Sindarin words for ankle.

I think this is enough body part words for now. I'm ready for something new.

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Tongue, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for tongue is lamba (physical tongue). Similar word lambë means language.

The Sindarin word for tongue is lam (physical tongue and language).

Monday, October 04, 2010

Tongue, in my words + tongues

tingu : tongue

The Illunse word for tongue is tingu. Tingu Rangadu (1982) is an Indian (Telugu) movie. Tingu is a masculine Indian first name. Tingu is a rare last name.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tongue which is lingua, and the Old English word for tongue which is tunge.

Both the Latin and the Old English words also have secondary meanings as speech, language.

tingua : tongues

The Illunse word for tongues (nominative plural) is tingua.

Tongues in Latin is linguae. Tongues in Old English is tungan.

Saturday, October 02, 2010

Bible trace from Genesis

This Bible verse, in Latin and various versions of English, is Genesis Chapter 21, Verse 14. I found this on Webster's Online Dictionary under the English word shoulder.

I find the Latin and Old English versions interesting, but I can't read much of either of them.

Latin, Vulgate - 405
surrexit itaque Abraham mane et tollens panem et utrem aquae inposuit scapulae eius tradiditque puerum et dimisit eam quae cum abisset errabat in solitudine Bersabee

Old English, West Saxon - 990
Abraham ða aras on ærne mergen sona ond lædde aweg ða wylne Agar ond Ismahel samod ond sealde him formete, hlaf, ond wæter, ond gewende him ham. Þa ða hi comon to þam westene Bersabee ða wurdon hi on gedwolan.

Middle English, Wycliffe - 1395
And so Abraham aroos erly, and takynge breed, and a botel of water, leide to the shuldur of hym, and bitoke the childe, and lefte hir; the which, whanne he `was gon awey, erride in the wildirnes of Bersabee.

Renaissance English, Tyndale - 1526
And Abraham rose vp early in the mornyng and toke brede and a bottell with water and gaue it vnto Hagar puttynge it on hir shulders wyth the lad also and sent her awaye. And she departed and wadred vpp and doune in the wyldernes of Berseba.

Jacobean English, King James - 1611
And Abraham rose up early in the morning, and took bread, and a bottle of water, and gave it unto Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, and the child, and sent her away: and she departed, and wandered in the wilderness of Beersheba.

Victorian English, Webster - 1833
And Abraham rose early in the morning, and took bread, and a bottle of water, and gave it to Hagar (putting it on her shoulder) and the child, and sent her away; and she departed, and wandered in the wilderness of Beer-sheba.

Basic English, Ogden - 1964
And early in the morning Abraham got up, and gave Hagar some bread and a water-skin, and put the boy on her back, and sent her away: and she went, wandering in the waste land of Beer-sheba

Friday, October 01, 2010

Shoulder, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for shoulder may be róma, but that meaning is likely obsolete. The dictionaries also define róma as horn (instrument) and loud sound, trumpet sound.

There doesn't appear to be a Sindarin word for shoulder.