Friday, April 22, 2011

Fifth, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for fifth is lempëa (fifth, ordinal).

The Sindarin word for fifth (adj. num. ord.) is lefnui.

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Fifth, in my words

finta : fifth

The Illunse word for fifth is finta. Finta is an uncommon last name. Finta is a Brazilian sportswear brand. In Italian, Portuguese and Spanish finta means feint. In Old English finta means "tail; consequence, result". Finta (or Finta Mare) is the name of a city in Romania.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for fifth fífta (fifth, as an ordinal), and the Latin word for fifth quintus (fifth (in a series); 5th part), which I transliterate to cwintus.

My Illunse word for five is finec.

Monday, April 18, 2011

Fourth, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for fourth is cantëa (fourth, ordinal).

The Sindarin word for fourth (adj. num. ord.) is canthui.

Friday, April 15, 2011

Fourth, in my words

ceurta : fourth

The Illunse word for fourth is ceurta. Similarly named Ceuta is an autonomous city of Spain and exclave located on the north coast of Africa surrounded by Morocco.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for fourth féorða (fourth, as an ordinal) which I transliterate to feortha, and the Latin word for fourth quartus (fourth (in a series); 4th part), which I transliterate to cwuartus.

Originally I was just going to do words for first, second and third. But I've worked out the words for more ordinal numbers. Tolkien did ordinals too.

I've changed this word, because I changed four from ceuwor to ceafor. My Illunse word for fourth is now cearta.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Third, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for third are neldëa (third, ordinal) and nelya (third).

The Sindarin words for third (adj. num. ord.) are nail and nelui.

Monday, April 11, 2011

Third, in my words

tirda : third

The Illunse word for third is tirda. Tirda is an unusual last name that can be Romanian. TIRDA is an acronym for Temporal Intermittent Rhythmic Delta Activity, which is an EEG (Electroencephalography) pattern.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for third þridda (third, as an ordinal) which I transliterate to thridda, and the Latin word for third tertius (third (in a series); 3rd part).

Saturday, April 09, 2011

Second, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya word for second is attëa (second, ordinal), replacing the archaic form tatya.

The Sindarin words for second are edwen (second, ordinal) and tadui (second, ordinal). The word taid means "second in command, supporting".

Thursday, April 07, 2011

Second, in my words

stend : second

The Illunse word for second is stend. Stend is an uncommon last name. Stend means stand in Icelandic. Stend is the name of a city in Norway.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for second óðer (one of two; second; other; something else, alternate, next) which I transliterate to other, and the Latin word for second secundus (next, following; second; secondary / inferior; subordinate).

My word looks more like, and takes more letters from the Latin word.

Monday, April 04, 2011

First, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words

The Quenya words for first are minya (first; eminent, prominent) and esta or yesta (first).

The Sindarin words for first are minui (first, proper ordinal in Sindarin), and erui (single, alone; first (incorrect use by the Gondorians)).

Sunday, April 03, 2011

First, in my words

pryst : first

The Illunse word for first is pryst. Pryst is an unusual last name. In Bulgarian (transliterated) pryst means finger.

This word is a mixture of the Old English word for first fyrst (first; foremost, principal, chief), and the Latin word for first primus (first, foremost / best, chief, principal; nearest / next).

Note there is an another Old English word for first, forma (the first, earliest).

Saturday, April 02, 2011

A Latin phrase

Here's a Latin phrase. I haven't posted a Latin proverb or phrase recently.

Latin phrase : Aut inveniam viam aut faciam

English translation : "I shall either find a way or make one"

According to Wikipedia: The phrase has been attributed to Hannibal; when his generals told him it was impossible to cross the Alps by elephant, this was supposedly his response. However, Hannibal would have spoken in Punic, not Latin.

The Punic language or Carthagian language is an extinct variety of the Phoenician language.