Saturday, December 31, 2011

Deer in my words (revised) + deer (plural)

derv : deer

The Illunse word for deer is derv. Derv is a rare last name. Derv is a rare first name. DERV is a UK term for diesel fuel for cars and lorries (from Diesel Engine Road Vehicle). In Breton derv means oak.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for deer which is cervus, and the Old English word for deer which is déor (wild beast (mostly in contrast to domestic animals); deer, reindeer).

My previous Illunse word for deer was derce.

dervas : deer (plural)

The Illunse word for deer (nominative plural) is dervas. Dervas is an ususual last name.

Deer (plural) in Latin is cervi. Deer (plural) in Old English is déor (plural is the same as the singular, something I've chosen not to do in Illunse).

Here's a link to Deer, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

By the way, I couldn't find a Quenya or a Sindarin word for tiger.

Friday, December 30, 2011

Tiger, in my words + tigers

tigir : tiger

The Illunse word for tiger is tigir. Tigir is a rare last name. In Old High German tigir means tiger. In Old Norse tigir means tens, as in 100 is tíu tigir or ten tens. Tigir is the name of a place in Pakistan.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for tiger which is tigris, and the Old English word for tiger which is tiger (same as modern English).

tigiras : tigers

The Illunse word for tigers (nominative plural) is tigiras. Tigiras is a computer user name.

Tigers in Latin is tigris or tigridis. Tigers in Old English is tigras.

So "lions and tigers and bears!" (oh my!), a memorable line from The Wizard of Oz, in Illunse is "leonas ed tigiras ed bursan".

Friday, December 16, 2011

Lion, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words + lions

The Quenya word for lion is . The word ravennë is she-lion. Lions, the plural, is rávi.

The Sindarin word for lion is raw. Lions, the plural, is roe. Note, this may be archaic Sindarin.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Lion, in my words + lions

leon : lion

The Illunse word for lion is leon. Leon is a masculine first name. Leon is a last name. León is a city and province of northwestern Spain. Kings of Leon is an American rock band. In Spanish león means lion. In Interlingua and Irish leon means lion. Leon is the name of cities in Mexico, the Philippines, and Nicaragua.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for lion which is leo, and the Old English word for lion which is léo or léona.

leonas : lions

The Illunse word for lions (nominative plural) is leonas. Leonas is an uncommon last name. Leona's restaurants in Chicago area. In Spanish Las Leonas, the nickname of the Argentina women's field hockey team, means The Lionesses.

Lions in Latin is leonis. Lions in Old English is léon or léonan.

Saturday, December 10, 2011

Bear, in my words (revised) + bears

bursa : bear

The Illunse word for bear is bursa. Bursa is a last name. In medieval Latin bursa means purse, funds. Bursa is a city in northwestern Turkey.

This word is a mixture of the Latin word for bear which is ursus, and the Old English word for bear which is bera.

My previous Illunse word for bear was bersu.

bursan : bears

The Illunse word for bears (nominative plural) is bursan. Bursan is an uncommon last name. Bursan is the name of a place in Ireland.

Bears in Latin is ursi. Bears in Old English is beran.

Here's a link to Bears, in Tolkien's words.

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Rats, in my words

rata : rats

The Illunse word for rats (nominative plural) is rata. Rata is a last name. Rata means rat (singular) in Catalan, Galician and Spanish. In Finnish rata means track, line. Rata means installment in Italian, Polish and Serbo-Croatian. In Maori rata means tame, quiet. Rata is the name of places in Indonesia, Pakistan, Romania, Soloman Islands, Vanuatu, New Zealand and Peru.

Rats in Latin is rati. Rats in Old English is rætas.

Rat in Illunse is ratu, which is a mix of the Latin word (ratus) and the Old English word (ræt).

If you haven't already noticed, my Illunse nominative case plurals are a bit complicated. I use guidelines that take into account the grammatical gender of the Latin and Old English words.

Here's a link to Rat, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

Spiders, in my words

acreopan : spiders

The Illunse word for spiders (nominative plural) is acreopan. Acreopan is similar to two words in some real estate ads, acre + open.

Spiders in Latin is aranei or araneae. Spiders in Old English is átorcoppan.

Spider in Illunse is acreopa, which is a mix of the Latin word (araneus or aranea) and the Old English word (átorcoppe).

Here's a link to Spider, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Monday, December 05, 2011

Snakes, in my words

snedra : snakes

The Illunse word for snakes (nominative plural) is snedra. Snedra is a rare term, various computer user names.

Snakes in Latin is serpentis. Snakes in Old English is nǽdran.

Snake in Illunse is snedre, which is a mix of the Latin word (serpens) and Old English word (nǽdre). There are other words for snake in both Latin and Old English.

Here's a link to Snake, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.

Sunday, December 04, 2011

Sheep (plural), in my words

scovan : sheep (plural)

The Illunse word for sheep (nominative plural) is scovan. Scovan is a rare last name.

Sheep (plural and also singular) in Latin is ovis. Sheep (plural and also singular) in Old English is scéap. Maybe this is why in Modern English you have one sheep and two or more sheep, instead of the plural being sheeps. In Illunse I'd like the singular and plural to be different.

Here's a link to Sheep, in J.R.R. Tolkien's words.